GZERO Media is seeking a Digital Marketing Specialist, to help fuel our growth and expansion. As Digital Marketing Specialist, you will be responsible for executing the digital marketing strategy, monitoring/optimizing analytics for the campaigns, and responsible for all social postings. You will oversee organic growth strategy, campaign reporting, and content execution on our social media platforms.

A strong candidate will have 2+ years experience as an analyst at an agency or media company with a role in social media brand strategy. The ideal candidate will have a background working within or with media companies around growing the audience for a newsletter, web series, podcast, or TV show.

Digital Marketing Specialist, will devise a strategy plan for growing the audience of each of our properties and monitor and test the success of various initiatives. Experience creating new insights with statistical modeling preferred. In addition, Digital Marketing Specialist will be responsible for executing social media campaigns and increase audience engagement on various platforms such as LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

You are someone who is entrepreneurial and looking for the opportunity to contribute to scaling a startup media business through your experience and diverse skillset. You have a background and education in analytics, growth, and/or social media strategy. You understand digital marketing more broadly and how various strategies can combine to hit goals for subscribers, views on videos, unique visitors and other metrics.

Qualifications:

  • 2+ years of experience as an analyst at an agency, publication, or relevant company
  • Prior experience working on social media campaigns & metrics
  • Ability to present reporting and analysis of campaign performance
  • Skilled multitasker
  • Email campaign management a plus
  • Geek mentality
  • Excellent organizational and time management skills
  • Creative problem solver
  • Great analytical skills

GZERO Media is a company dedicated to providing the public with intelligent and engaging coverage of global affairs. It was created in 2017 as a subsidiary of Eurasia Group, the world's leading political risk analysis firm. Our coverage takes many forms – print, digital media and broadcast television. Find us at gzeromedia.com.

Start date: ASAP with full benefits.

Perks of working at GZERO Media:

  • Be a part of an exciting, fast-growing media venture centered around the analysis and explanation of international politics.
  • The opportunity to work with a talented and entrepreneurial team in a global environment.
  • Flexible work environment, with contemporary offices located in New York (Flatiron), DC (DuPont Circle) and London (Clerkenwell).
  • PTO bank of 23 days, 10 paid holidays and 2 summer Fridays.
  • A strong belief in work-life balance.
  • Competitive salary plus incentive compensation plan.
  • Rich benefits package – The firm contributes 82-90% to medical and dental premiums, 100% employer-paid LTD, STD and life insurance, 401(k) plus fully vested employer match and pre-tax commuter benefits.
  • Business casual dress code.

Eurasia Group is an equal opportunity employer.

  • Previous and successful experience working in a dynamic company experiencing a huge growth.
  • Geek mentality
  • Excellent organizational and time management skills
  • Creative problem solver
  • Great analytical skills

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