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Roe v. Wade Overturned: Abortion Restricted in Half of US States | GZERO World

Roe v. Wade overturned: Abortion restricted in half of US states

Now that the US Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, roughly half the states have legislation on the books restricting abortion.

And 13 of them had "trigger laws" to ban abortion once the 1973 ruling was struck down. Residents of those states seeking abortions must now travel across state lines to get an abortion — and Missouri wants to sue those who do.

What's more, it'll be a long drive: an average of 125 miles, compared to just 25 when Roe was still the law of the land, Ian Bremmer explains on GZERO World.

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From Russia’s bombs to Poland’s 'war on women'

More than two million Ukrainians, mostly women and children, have sought refuge in Poland since the Russian onslaught began on February 24.

Poland, historically hostile to migrants, has been praised for welcoming fleeing Ukrainians with open arms. But many Ukrainian women who’ve reached Poland, though now safe from Russian cluster bombs, are finding themselves trapped in a country with scarce access to contraception and abortion. Having escaped Russia’s war of conquest, they now find themselves navigating Poland’s war against women.

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Afghan Activist Pashtana Durrani, Who Fled To The US, Is Skeptical Of Taliban’s Claims | GZERO World

Afghan activist Pashtana Durrani, who fled to the US, is skeptical of Taliban’s claims

The Taliban claims they will allow women and children to go to school, but that reality has not been realized, says Afghan education activist Pashtana Durrani.

The last time that she spoke with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World, she was in hiding, moving location to location, in order to avoid the Taliban as they took over the country. Now safely in the US after fleeing Afghanistan in October, she is working as a senior fellow at Wellesley College and continuing her work on girls education in the country she fled. Her nonprofit, LEARN, has started emergency relief programs for women and children facing malnutrition and starvation.

“I'll believe them when they open schools for girls. I will believe them when they open working spaces for girls. I'll believe them when they actually walk the talk instead of them claiming whatever they do,” she said in a new interview on GZERO World.

"Women Fell Between the Cracks" During COVID — Former UN Women Chief | GZERO Media

"Women fell between the cracks" during COVID — former UN Women chief

During the pandemic, former UN Women chief Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka says many women were "caught up in the crossfire that is not of their own making," accounting for two-thirds of jobs lost due to COVID. What's more, she adds, women forced into the informal job market to make ends meet had a hard time returning to formal jobs once lockdowns ended. And since government incentives didn't target them enough, "women fell between the cracks."

She spoke during "Measuring what matters: How women are critical to pandemic recovery," a livestream conversation on October 28, 2021, hosted by GZERO Media in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The Pandemic’s Impact on Women and the Global Economy | GZERO Media

The pandemic’s impact on women and the global economy

What pandemic result will have the largest and longest-lasting impact on women? Is the world really building back better for half the global population? How can we ensure that the post-pandemic recovery is fair to women? And how does this all play into a wider GZERO world? A group of global experts debated these and other questions during a livestream conversation hosted by GZERO Media in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, moderated by eNCA senior news anchor Tumelo Mothotoane.

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The war on (period) poverty

Brazil's bold President Jair Bolsonaro did a bad thing this week. He blocked legislation that would have provided free sanitary pads and tampons to disadvantaged Brazilian women and girls. In a country where 25 percent of girls miss school because they don't have access to sanitary products or bathrooms when they're menstruating, this is a pretty big deal.

Laws aimed at addressing period poverty — lack of financial access to basic hygiene products like pads, tampons, and soap – are often framed by male-dominated governments as excessive and inessential. They are so wrong.

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Afghan Girls Should Stay in School Despite Taliban Rule — Activist | GZERO Media

Afghan girls should stay in school despite Taliban rule, activist says

If you're an Afghan girl, teacher and activist Pashtana Durrani says it's time to tell the Taliban you'll keep going to school because it's your right — and good for Afghanistan after 20 years of relying on the US. "We have to do something on our own, and for that it's very important to start by educating ourselves [...] by becoming a scientist, a doctor, a teacher, to have that human capacity to serve the country for the greater good." Just because a few men in Kabul have changed, she adds, that doesn't justify "that we have to change our way of life for them." Watch her interview with GZERO World's Ian Bremmer.

Watch the full interview: Afghan activist: Taliban won't make us change our way of life

Afghan Activist: Taliban Won’t Make Us Change Our Way of Life | GZERO Media

Afghan activist: Taliban won’t make us change our way of life

While many Afghans are trying to flee the country, others have gone into hiding, moving around to escape the Taliban but doing their part to stand up to Afghanistan's new rulers. One of them is teacher and women's rights activist Pashtana Durrani. In a wide-ranging interview with GZERO World's Ian Bremmer, Durrani tackles several hot topics, like what's next for Afghan girls, whether the Taliban can actually govern, and how they'll behave after all Americans are out. "Just because a few men in Kabul, in the Presidential Palace, have changed, that doesn't justify the fact that we have to change our way of life for them." She also pushes back against the Biden administration's claim that the Afghan army didn't want to fight the Taliban, and shares her feelings about the US after 20 years of occupation and war.

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