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A woman cries in support of Mahsa Amini and Iran's women's movement

Reuters/ GZERO Media

Why Iran’s protests are different this time

They come from the capital city and from rural townships. Some wear makeup and jeans while others are clad in traditional robes though they leave their silver hair uncovered. They are all Iranian women uniting against the Islamic Republic’s oppressive regime.

Nationwide protests – that have spread to Iran's 31 provinces – broke out on Sept. 17 after Mahsa Amini, 22, a young Iranian woman, was allegedly beaten to death by the regime’s “morality police” for failing to fully cover her hair.

🌖A symbol like the moon🌖. Mahsa, a name of Persian origin that means like the moon, has emerged as a symbol of the ayatollahs’ oppressive system that sometimes sends women to “reeducation centers” for failing to comply with strict modesty requirements – sometimes with deadly consequences.

Iran has a long tradition of mass demonstrations, including those that led to the 1979 revolution and the country’s current system of clerical despotism. However, in recent years many of the country’s mass movements have had their momentum halted by brute government force. Will this time be different?

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Taliban Regime Has Been “Death in Slow Motion” for Afghan Women | GZERO World

Taliban regime has been “death in slow motion” for Afghan women

Fawzia Koofi was a member of Afghan Parliament from 2005 until last year, when the Taliban swept back to power.

On GZERO World, Koofi describes her experience working as one of the only female voices at the table during the negotiations with the Taliban.

In the room, they promised Koofi that women would play an active role in Afghan society. They even hinted at an inclusive government.

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A fighter is seen at the Taliban flag-raising ceremony in Kabul.

REUTERS/Ali Khara

The Taliban’s one-year report card in Afghanistan

A year ago, the Taliban won their war in Afghanistan. On Aug. 15, 2021, as they entered Kabul in a lightning advance that shocked the world, images of a botched US exit permanently scarred America’s legacy in its longest war — a mission US commanders now admit they lost track of years ago.

But where does Afghanistan stand a year after the Taliban took over?

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Human Rights in Saudi Arabia Under MBS | GZERO World

Activist Loujain al-Hathloul is far from free in MBS's reformed Saudi Arabia

In 2014, Loujain al Hathloul did the unthinkable: attempt to drive into Saudi Arabia, the last country in the world with a driving ban for women.

That changed four years later after Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, aka MBS, removed the restriction on women, she explains on GZERO World.

But just six weeks before the ban was lifted there, she was arrested in the UAE and flown to Riyadh against her will. Loujain later spent more than 1,000 days behind bars for her activism defending women's rights.

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Health Data Privacy Is the Next Post-Roe Fight | GZERO World

Health data privacy is the next post-Roe fight

Now that the US Supreme Court has ruled that states can do their own thing on abortion rights, women are worried about who can check their online personal health data.

Apps have been a game-changer for American women tracking their menstrual cycles, ovulation, or pregnancy status. But that information could be used against them where abortion is illegal.

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Ian Explains: The US Is a Global Outlier on Abortion Rights | GZERO World

Abortion rights are expanding around the world while the US is an outlier

Almost 50 years ago, the wife of a Republican US president came out in favor of abortion. Good luck with that happening today.
We now live in a much more divided country — as has been on full display after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and removed the constitutional right to an abortion, Ian Bremmer tells GZERO World.

Interestingly, much of the rest of the world has been moving in the opposite direction. Largely Catholic countries in Latin America and Europe have legalized abortion in recent years, while African nations have rolled back or are rethinking colonial-era abortion bans.

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Roe v. Wade Overturned: Abortion Restricted in Half of US States | GZERO World

Roe v. Wade overturned: Abortion restricted in half of US states

Now that the US Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, roughly half the states have legislation on the books restricting abortion.

And 13 of them had "trigger laws" to ban abortion once the 1973 ruling was struck down. Residents of those states seeking abortions must now travel across state lines to get an abortion — and Missouri wants to sue those who do.

What's more, it'll be a long drive: an average of 125 miles, compared to just 25 when Roe was still the law of the land, Ian Bremmer explains on GZERO World.

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Wads of British Pound Sterling banknotes.

Reuters

Hard Numbers: British inflation soars, Spain adopts menstrual leave, COVID stimulus gambler fesses up, Schröder to be evicted

9: Inflation in the UK has risen to 9%, a four-decade high, as Britons grapple with the worst cost-of-living crisis in half a century. Energy bills for the average household rose by almost £700 ($865) a year in April, and the Bank of England warns that the surge will likely worsen this fall.

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