Living
Beyond Borders

GZERO Media and Citi Private Bank are pleased to present “Living Beyond Borders” with a special-edition podcast series, articles, and graphics that examine how our lives change as the world changes.

Special edition podcast: The world after coronavirus: Where's the upside?

In June of 2020, the world is facing an unprecedented two-fold crisis we didn't see coming just months ago. Global health experts are racing to eradicate the largest pandemic in more than a century, as governments and economists try to stabilize markets and get industries back to work again.

In a special edition of the GZERO World podcast, in partnership with Citi Private Bank, we're looking at how COVID-19 has exacerbated existing economic and geopolitical challenges and created some new ones along the way. But it also presents opportunities for real growth and change.

More Less
Subscribe to our global politics
newsletter Signal

Podcast

GZERO World presents a special edition of our weekly podcast, produced in partnership with Citi Private Bank. The first quarter of 2020 isn't yet over, but the world has seen headlines ranging from a US standoff with Iran to fears of global recession and the ongoing outbreak of coronavirus.

Ian Bremmer is joined by David Bailin, Managing Director and Chief Investment Officer for Citi Private Bank, in a conversation moderated by Eurasia Group's Head of Research Strategy & Operations Meredith Sumpter.

Articles

What We're Watching: How the pandemic affects Europe, emerging markets, and populist leaders

How does Europe fit in? Even before the pandemic struck, Europe was struggling to redefine its role in a world where the US is a more fickle ally and China is a more assertive challenger. In particular, Brussels has been trying to style itself as a global leader in the responsible regulation of tech companies. In some ways, the pandemic has boosted those ambitions: as governments use contact tracing apps and facial recognition to help stop the spread, Brussels regulators are paying close attention. They're also cracking down on misinformation about the coronavirus. But first the EU has a bigger challenge to address. Faced with the worst economic crisis in its history, it has to prove to a rising chorus of (euro)skeptics that it is capable of cushioning the blow, and equitably rebooting economic growth across the Union. The European Commission, fearing an economic and even political fragmentation of the bloc, has unveiled an unprecedented 750 billion euro coronavirus rescue plan -- but not all member states are in favor.

More Less

The Graphic Truth: Competing and cooperating on a COVID-19 vaccine

The global race is on to develop a vaccine against COVID-19. While it usually takes many years to develop and widely distribute vaccines, scientists around the world are now trying to get one ready within the next year — an unprecedented time frame. The race has generated fierce competition among countries, as everyone wants to develop a vaccine on their home turf first, not only for prestige, but also to get their citizens at the front of the line for the shots when they are available. Still, while the scientific world is now rife with geopolitical rivalries over the COVID-19 vaccine, there's also a lot of international collaboration going on behind the scenes. Here's a look at the vaccines currently in Phase II of the clinical trial process, meaning they are being tested on hundreds of people of various age groups to determine their effectiveness and safety. If they pass this stage they move to wider testing in Phase III, the final step before approval.

The Graphic Truth: How COVID-19 will affect major economies

Lockdowns and social distancing restrictions have brought much of the global economy to a halt over the past few months, causing unprecedented levels of joblessness and throwing international commerce into disarray. As the virus continued to spread throughout the first quarter of the year (there are now cases in at least 188 countries and territories) the IMF updated its original growth forecast for 2020, and the predictions are grim. The world's largest economies – China, the US and the Euro area – are set to experience massive year-on-year contraction. But there's a silver lining: The IMF says that there are signs of a promising economic recovery for these economic regions in 2021. Here's a look at the numbers.

Hard Numbers: Vietnam on the rise, China delays developing countries' debt, Americans wary of Chinese power, European woes

5: At a time when most national economies are reeling, one country is faring very well. After responding to the pandemic early and quickly, Vietnam, one of the fastest growing economies in the world, has recorded no deaths from COVID-19 and even is slated to grow by 5 percent this year. Meanwhile, large economies like the US, Japan, and Australia have officially entered recessions.

More Less