You'd think, being the relatively hopeful person that you are, that the nauseating anguish of Brexit would be more or less over now that UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has finally reached a deal with Brussels on how to extricate the UK from the European Union.

Read Now Show less

"Don't be a tough guy," Trump said. "Don't be a fool." Make a deal. Those were his words of wisdom for Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in an extremely peculiar letter of warning about the consequences of continuing Turkey's invasion of Syria. Well, today the American government's top two Mikes (VP Pence and Secretary of State Pompeo) flew to Ankara to make a deal. And what a deal it was...for Erdogan.

Read Now Show less

In a major and unexpected reversal of longstanding US policy, the White House has given Turkey a green light to send its forces into northern Syria, an area currently controlled by US-backed Kurdish militias who have been fighting ISIS. US troops are pulling back. Turkey is delighted. The Kurds are dismayed. Even ISIS might have something to smile about now. By Monday evening, Turkish forces had already waged attacks against American-backed Kurdish forces, which are part of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF).

Read Now Show less

Three Months Ago – EU and South American nations strike major trade deal

Back in July, we wrote about a historic trade deal between the EU and Mercosur, a Latin American trade bloc that includes Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay. The agreement, which took 20 years to hash out, removes most tariffs on EU exports and will open up Europe to more South American agricultural goods. Together, the EU and Mercosur countries are home to 720 million people and account for a quarter of global GDP. But the agreement, which still needs to be ratified by each country (that's 28 in Europe alone) was thrown into doubt after Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's flippant response to massive Amazon fires, prompting France's President Emmanuel Macron to threaten to block the deal unless Brazil improves its environmental standards. German environmental and political groups have also opposed the deal. But the biggest roadblock yet could come from Argentina, where leftwing protectionist Alberto Fernandez, the favorite to become Argentina's new president in elections later this month, has said the deal would be "disadvantageous for Argentina." Realistically, a trade deal billed as the largest in history could come crashing down fast.

Read Now Show less

You may know Ukraine from such ongoing dramas, or tragicomedies, as The Impeachment of Donald Trump, but the war-wracked country has much bigger issues to address closer to home.

Read Now Show less

Although there has recently been a small uptick in popular support for impeachment (especially among Republicans), it's still a deeply polarizing issue with no majority for or against. The Democrats are hoping that the investigations' findings will convince more of the public to support impeachment, making it easier for fence-sitting Representatives on both sides of the aisle to vote in favor. At the same time, the White House and most Republicans are banking that the continuing unpopularity of impeachment will mean the process turns into a political trainwreck for the Democrats as the 2020 election approaches. Here's a look at how popular sentiment on impeachment has evolved over the past year, and where things stand now.

"We have stood up!" were communist leader Mao Zedong's words just days before he proclaimed the foundation of the People's Republic of China (PRC) 70 years ago this morning. Having won an unlikely victory over Western-backed nationalists in a brutal civil war, Mao's message was one of defiance, solidarity, and continued struggle.

Read Now Show less

The world is getting older. By 2030, the population that is over the age of 65 will rise by nearly 40 percent. By 2050, it will more than double. Aging populations present a host of political and social challenges. How can fewer workers fund a growing population of retirees, many of whom have been promised fat pensions? How can healthcare systems manage a big uptick in chronic diseases like heart disease, cancer, or Alzheimer's without going broke? Is immigration the answer? Or robots? These are just a few of the questions the next generation of political leaders will have to grapple with as our populations get older. Here's a look at which countries are going gray fastest.