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Inequality Isn't Inevitable - If Global Communities Cooperate | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Almost three years after COVID, we're still grappling with the geopolitical convulsions that the pandemic unleashed or worsened. They're all wiping out decades of progress on fighting global inequality.

What's more, the world has become more unequal at a time when global cooperation is often an afterthought. So, what can we do about it?

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer speaks to UN Foundation President and CEO Elizabeth Cousens, who thinks it's the perfect time for institutions backed by the 1 percent to step up even more.

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Listen: Global inequality has reached a level we haven’t seen in our lifetimes and recent geopolitical convulsions have only made things worse. The rich have gotten richer while extreme poverty has exploded. UN Foundation President Elizabeth Cousens thinks it's the perfect time for institutions backed by the 1% to step up. She speaks with Ian Bremmer on the GZERO World podcast about the key role that innovative philanthropy could play to address problems exacerbated by the war in Ukraine, economic fallout from the COVID pandemic, and a warming planet.

Why now? The stakes are so high and the crises so urgent that Cousens sees a window of opportunity for philanthropy to take swift action instead of their traditional long-term approach. When it comes to immediate and deadly problems like famine and flooding, an influx of money could start making a huge difference very quickly.

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform, to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.

Ian Bremmer Explains: We're in "Polycrisis" (& It's Not As Fun As It Sounds) | GZERO World

After a pandemic hiatus in 2021 and a weird summer edition last year, Davos is back in 2023.

How does the World Economic Forum describe all the problems we'll likely face this year? One word: polycrisis, Ian Bremmer explains on GZERO World.

That means many crises all at once, which compound each other, like tangled knots.

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Water Will Become Very Political in 2023, Says Eurasia Group Analyst | GZERO Media

Perhaps the biggest surprise in Eurasia Group's top 10 geopolitical risks for 2023 is No. 10: water scarcity. But you should definitely pay attention to it.

The problem is that we take access to water for granted, says Eurasia Group analyst Franck Gbaguidi.

And while we've kept ignoring the issue, now the global population has hit 8 billion people. What's more, climate change is making water even less plentiful — and therefore more political.

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Biodiversity Loss Might Break the System — And Businesses Aren’t Ready | GZERO Media

When Ian Bremmer turned 50 in 2019, he was shocked to know there was less than half the biodiversity left on the planet than when he was born.

That's depressing, but hopefully it'll soon have a snapback effect on humans and the economy, Eurasia Group's president says during "Time for nature: Turning biodiversity risk into opportunity," a livestream conversation hosted by GZERO in partnership with Suntory.

Businesses, he adds, will suffer if biodiversity loss is not reversed: "Production costs are going to increase. Profitability is going to drop. Prices are going to have to go up for end consumers. Inflation is going to go up."

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Investors Chasing Opportunities In Biodiversity | GZERO Media

For years, investors have been largely absent from nature financing. But now you have opportunities across all asset classes.

"If we don't start mobilizing private capital, we're going to have an issue" with biodiversity, Ingrid Kukuljan, head of Impact & Sustainable Investing at Federated Hermes, says during "Time for nature: Turning biodiversity risk into opportunity," a livestream conversation hosted by GZERO in partnership with Suntory.

So, where are the opportunities?

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What’s Walmart Doing on Biodiversity? | GZERO Media

Retailers like Walmart derive the bulk of their sales from products that ultimately originate in nature. That means they have a stake in reversing the course of biodiversity loss.

"The business community has woken up and taken notice of this," Kathleen McLaughlin, Walmart's executive VP and chief sustainability officer, says "Time for nature: Turning biodiversity risk into opportunity," a livestream conversation hosted by GZERO in partnership with Suntory.

As a result, Walmart is doing its part by engaging with its suppliers on biodiversity protection. It's the only way, she adds, to "protect, restore, and better manage 50 million acres of land and a million square miles of ocean" where the company indirectly sources raw materials for its products.

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