TikTok ban: warning from US to Chinese tech firms

Jon Lieber, Managing Director for the United States at the Eurasia Group, shares his perspective on US politics.

Where are US-China relations in this battle over TikTok and what is happening?

Well, this may seem like a minor deal. It's a video sharing app that the president has given 45 days to sell to a US entity or get banned in the United States. But along with WeChat, these are two of China's most successful technology companies that the US has now banned from entry into the United States and potentially banned from being used on operating systems that rely on US software inside China. So, this is a huge escalation in the geotech war between the United States and China. China for a long time has not allowed Google and Facebook and other American applications to be fully operative inside their borders. And now the US is stepping up against Chinese technology companies. The reason is that there's concerns among the US government about these tech, these apps data security practices. Members of the military, high ranking government officials aren't allowed to have these on their phones because there's concern about what China does with the data that they can harvest from those phones. This is a real warning sign to other Chinese technology companies that they may not be welcome inside the American market unless they can prove in some way, they are totally independent from the Chinese government and the Chinese military. Expect a lot of escalation in this area over the coming months and years.

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Trump won't back off TikTok ban; China may react against US tech firms

Ian Bremmer shares his perspective on global politics on this week's World In (More Than) 60 Seconds:

Donald Trump, TikTok, and Microsoft. What's the story?

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Episodes

Trump can't delay the election. But can he delegitimize it?

Jon Lieber, Managing Director for the United States at the Eurasia Group, shares his perspective on US politics .

First question, Trump tweeted about delaying the election. What's the deal?

Second question, with COVID relief measures set to expire, where are congressional talks on another stimulus bill?

Third question, will the death of former presidential candidate Herman Cain change anyone's mind about the coronavirus?


Will the Ukraine ceasefire last? COVID containment in Europe

Carl Bildt, former Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Sweden, with the view from Europe:

Will the recent ceasefire between Ukraine and the Russian-backed separatists lead to a solution of the conflict?

Will the recent upsurge of coronavirus and different measures taken against it in Spain lead to a new lockdown in Europe?

Why SPAC IPOs are getting so big and popular

Betty Liu, Executive Vice Chairman for NYSE Group, explains:


Why have SPACs been so popular recently?

What is the biggest SPAC IPO ever?

Notre Dame won't host debate; India bans Chinese apps; this year's Hajj

Ian Bremmer brings you his perspective on this week's World In (More Than) 60 Seconds:


Notre Dame withdrew from hosting the first presidential debate this fall. No, not that one that one burnt down, though it's being rebuilt. What does this mean for the debates in general?

India is blocking more Chinese apps. How serious are tensions between the two countries?

What's going on in Malaysia?

How is this year's Hajj different from past pilgrimages?

Hosts

Jon Lieber, Eurasia Group’s Managing Director for the US
Break down the US political landscape with Jon Lieber
Ian Bremmer, Eurasia Group President
Tackle the world’s biggest headlines with Ian Bremmer
Betty Liu, Executive Vice Chairman for NYSE Group
Carl Bildt, former Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Sweden
Carl Bildt provides his perspective from Europe
Nicholas Thompson, Wired Editor-in-Chief
The biggest topics in tech with Nicholas Thompson