How to reimagine a business after COVID-19

What does it take to reimagine a business and bring it back successfully in this next normal?

Well, I think it's important to understand this is not just about returning a business to what it was. It's about reimagining what it should be given the changes that this current pandemic has created. And I think there are four essential steps.

Read Now Show less

Latest

Law Enforcement & Tech; Facebook Staff Concerns; Musk vs Bezos

Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, helps us make sense of today's stories in technology:

What kind of technology is law enforcement using in their standoff with protesters?

Keep reading... Show less

Sweden Coronavirus Regrets; Boris Johnson's Hong Kong Promise

Sweden's state epidemiologist has expressed regrets about not having tighter coronavirus controls. What's the reaction been in Sweden?

Well, the guy has been going somewhat back and forth over what he actually meant by that particular statement. But I think there's a general feeling, yes, we could have done things better that relates to testing and that relates to quite a number of other things. And there is a concern that as Europe is now opening up, Swedes are treated as slightly different, slightly more dangerous than people from other countries. There is concern over that.

Keep reading... Show less

What's Next for America; Protests & Pandemic; Hong Kong Autonomy

On the latest edition of World In 60 Seconds, Ian Bremmer brings an extra-long analysis to pressing issues:

Pandemic, economic depression and now mass protests. What's next for America?

I'm not surprised by this level of dissent publicly, given how long social inequality has persisted and how much worse it's being made by coronavirus. You're going to see a lot of people on the streets because we've got 25% unemployment right now. A lot of people are going to go back to work, but a lot aren't. It's heading towards the summer, people are soon coming out of lockdown and may feel safer in terms of the pandemic, especially in NY and in LA where the caseload has gone down. We also have very deep divisions.

Keep reading... Show less

Trump's Poor Response to National Protests, WHO Withdrawal Mid-COVID

Ben White, Chief Economic Correspondent for Politico, provides his perspective on the big news in US politics:

How is the White House responding to the mass protests and riots happening nationwide?

Keep reading... Show less

Trump vs Twitter; Civilians in Space?

Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, explains the feud between Trump and Twitter and weighs in on Elon Musk's ambitious space plans:

What is happening between Trump and Twitter?

A lot. Twitter decided it had to fact check the president because the president said something that wasn't entirely true, and perhaps was false, about voting. Twitter cares a lot about lies about voting. So, they fact check Trump. Trump got really mad, said he's going to get rid of some of the laws that protect Twitter from liability when people say bad things on their platform. That started war number one.

Keep reading... Show less

What silver linings, if any, are there from the dreadful pandemic which we've all been experiencing?

This has been a humanitarian disaster. And therefore, it's a little incongruous to talk about silver linings, but there are a few. First off, we've all learned how to work digitally and what that means for our businesses. There's a new appreciation of how to take processes and make them more efficient using digital and other techniques. How to serve customers through a contact free environment and how to make a difference every day by staying in touch through digital means. The second silver lining may actually be around the way decisions themselves get made. The piece. The ability to bring together the bare facts necessary in order to make a decision and no longer agonizing over a lot of superfluous information that makes no difference, but actually just adds to bureaucracy and takes time. The third is indeed waste. Because we've all been under so much pressure and we've be working remotely, there's a renewed appreciation for what matters. What is it in the business that we need to do and do really well? And what is it we don't?

Read Now Show less

Kevin Sneader, global managing partner for McKinsey & Company, provides perspective on how corporate business leaders think in response to the global coronavirus crisis:

What do I need to do now to prepare my business for return?

Read Now Show less

Kevin Sneader, global managing partner for McKinsey & Company, provides perspective on what corporate business leaders are thinking during the global coronavirus crisis: How does business think about the many conflicting forces that it faces in the midst of this global health pandemic?

Read Now Show less

Kevin Sneader, global managing partner for McKinsey & Company, provides perspective on what corporate business leaders are thinking during the global coronavirus crisis: Is it too early to envision how the world could look after Covid-19?

Well, in some respects, it is too early. We're still fighting a global pandemic. And most, if not all, effort needs to be on that. But at the same time, I am hearing business leaders beginning to talk about what it will take to resurrect their businesses and in doing so, resurrect the global economy, a task that is vital for all our futures. And as they do so, I think it is possible to discern the shape of a world post Covid-19.

Read Now Show less

Kevin Sneader, global managing partner for McKinsey & Company, provides perspective on what corporate business leaders are thinking during the global coronavirus crisis:

One of the questions I find myself being asked a lot in these days is, can normal working be effective?

Read Now Show less

Kevin Sneader, global managing partner for McKinsey & Company, provides perspective on what corporate business leaders are thinking during the global coronavirus crisis:

While confronting challenges due to coronavirus, what advice are business leaders turning to you for?

Read Now Show less

Kevin Sneader, global managing partner for McKinsey & Company, provides perspective on how corporate business leaders should respond during the global coronavirus crisis:

I think the question every business leader will probably have to answer is, what did you do during this war, this battle against coronavirus?

Read Now Show less

How has corporate America changed since the events of 2008?

Really, there are three forces which have changed corporate America for good. One: Globalization. No longer seen as the panacea, now seen as a real force that may actually be dismantled, as barriers go up across the world, forcing businesses to reevaluate their supply chains. Two: Rising inequality. Questioning the role of business and its contribution in society more generally, leading to a shift among CEOs from the shareholder to the stakeholders, the many that now require a different set of metrics and a different way of doing things. And thirdly, of course, the change that's been brought about now as the climate becomes a source of instability. For years business was able to plan, safe and secure in the knowledge that the environment at least was something that predictably would not cause an issue. Well, today that's no longer the case. Whether it's global warming and with it, the temperature changes which have led to some of the flooding and indeed the very different forces which are changing insurance premiums around the world or indeed the attitude of the young men towards those who pollute the environment. There isn't a business out there that can afford not to act and take stock of their environmental footprint. So, much has changed and it's not going back.