GZERO World Podcast

This week Ian takes a close look at today's polarized political environment and asks a simple question: who is to blame? Republicans? Democrats? The media? Then he sits down with former CNN bureau chief Frank Sesno, a media veteran himself. And of course, we've got puppets. #fakenews #cnn #trump

This week Ian talks trade wars and TPP. Then he sits down with U.S. Senator Chris Coons to discuss the politics of instability around the world and in Washington, DC. And of course, we've got your Puppet Regime.

In April 2016 nearly 200 countries including the US and China signed the Paris Climate Accord. But that was then. Trump came to office and backed out of the deal. Now other countries are starting to follow his lead. Ian will break it all down and sit down New York Times reporter Andrew Ross Sorkin, who knows a thing or two about the business community's approach to climate change.

GZERO World usually takes on big global topics that impact multiple countries. This show is different, however, in that it’ll focus on just one: South Africa — a country that once captured world attention when it transitioned from apartheid to modern democracy. But the nation’s long walk to freedom is falling short of what was promised.

This week it’s all about j-o-b-s and how automation (yes, robots…kind of) is changing the future of work in America. Then I’ll chat with a man from the heart of America’s rust belt: Governor John Kasich. And of course, I’ve got your Puppet Regime.

Ian talks with Sigmar Gabriel, formerly Germany’s Foreign Minister and Vice-Chancellor and currently an outspoken member of the Bundestag. That’s like the U.S. House of Representatives with a two-beer minimum. And of course, we’ve got your Puppet Regime.

This week Ian looks ahead to the upcoming U.S. midterm elections, and digs into what’s at stake. Then he’ll talk to a man who’s got plenty of skin in the game: Joaquin Castro, Democratic Congressman from Texas. And of course, we’ve got your Puppet Regime.

What happens if there are no consequences for murder? Does it make it easier for it to happen again? The killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi at a Saudi consulate in Turkey may put those questions to the test. Ian examines them with a man who came to know Khashoggi personally over the past 15 years: Two-time Pulitzer prize winner Nicholas Kristof of The New York Times. Then, of course, puppets.