GZERO World Podcast


"Decoupling." It's a word more closely associated with celebrities than global politics. But when it comes to the United States and China, it represents the biggest geopolitical shift to happen since the fall of the Berlin Wall. In the latest episode of GZERO World, Ian Bremmer examines the implications of the two giants going their separate ways in technology. What will it mean for consumers, and will other countries be forced to pick sides in the cyber battle?


The crisis in Venezuela couldn't get any worse, until it did. Brexit had to get done, until it didn't. The Mueller Report would be a bombshell, until it landed like a dud. And Pelosi would never bring forth impeachment, until she did. This was 2019. And then on Puppet Regime it's open mic night at the White House.

There's no shortage of Democratic presidential candidates in 2020, but when it comes to Republicans it's a lonely road. Enter Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld, who is attempting the unthinkable for a Republican not named Trump: He's running for President. And then on Puppet Regime, Putin gives Trump a holiday gift, and Trump takes it for a spin.

In the latest episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer, we're examining enormous income and quality of life disparities in some of the most liberal, Democratic spots on the U.S. map—major cities. Urbanist and author Richard Florida explains the reasons why large urban areas contain such extremes—the richest and the poorest people often dwelling within blocks of one another. Ian first breaks down the historic trends that at one point pushed the "haves" to the suburbs and the "have nots" into inner city neighborhoods, and how that has reversed over time. Later in the program, GZERO visits the South Bronx, per capita the poorest congressional district in America, and checks in with a nonprofit group making a difference there for people in need. Room to Grow serves families with children ages 0-3, providing them resources and counseling to increase their chances of success. Finally, in Puppet Regime, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has some of his own ideas about urban development.

Worried Sick


The "Spanish flu" virus of 1918 killed an estimated 50 million people, more than all the deaths in World War I combined. While global public health efforts have greatly improved mortality rates in more modern outbreaks, experts say the next pandemic is a matter of "when," not "if." In this episode, Ian Bremmer takes a look how diseases spread and become global. His guest, Dr. Anthony Fauci, is a leading epidemiologist and director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the NIH.

Read Now


Last year, no one knew his name. Today the Yang Gang is growing as fast as his campaign is raising money. But when it comes to his flagship policy proposal, do the numbers add up? Ian Bremmer interviews Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, and the two talk about universal basic income, technology, foreign policy, and why Yang isn't thrilled about Mike Bloomberg entering the race. Plus, GZERO Media hits the streets in NYC, Phoenix, and Minneapolis to see what Americans think about the possibility of an extra $1000 each month via Yang's "Freedom Dividend." And on Puppet Regime, President Trump's making phone calls to world leaders again!

Clerical Errors


The Catholic Church is facing tremendous internal upheaval and Pope Francis is at the center of it. Our guest is a Jesuit priest who recently had a private audience with the Pontiff, and who has courted plenty of controversy of his own. In a candid conversation with Ian Bremmer, bestselling author Fr. James Martin discusses the moment of potential schism the Church is facing. On issues like LGBT inclusion, immigration, and income inequality, Pope Francis has moved the Church into a more progressive place, one that traditionalists and conservatives oppose. Meanwhile, the scandals continue to take a toll on Church membership and credibility. Fr. Martin frankly and honestly addresses all these issues and more.


When President Trump decided to officially withdraw American troops from Kurdish-controlled Syria, many people, including some in his own administration, were shocked. But the Kurds, themselves? Today's guest says, "Not so much." In this episode, Ian Bremmer breaks down the long and tragic history of the Kurdish people, the group's geopolitical significance in the region and beyond, and the many times the U.S. has left this ally stranded politically or militarily. This show also contains a field interview with NYC pizza magnate Hakki Akdeniz, a Kurdish immigrant who came to the U.S. broke and homeless. He now has a booming business, more than 3 million Instagram followers, and he's giving back by feeding homeless people on the city streets.