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Putin's rare North Korea visit will deepen ties
Putin's rare North Korea visit will deepen ties | Ian Bremmer | World In: 60

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

Will Putin's rare visit to North Korea strengthen anti-West alignment?

It's deepening the relationship. There's no question. He hasn't been in North Korea in decades. And I mean they call it the Hermit Kingdom. It's completely totalitarian. It's incredibly poor. But they have a massive military and they've been providing an awful lot thousands and thousands of train containers, of weaponry, of ammunition, of artillery. And those containers haven't gone back empty from Russia. And there's been a lot of sense of technology that's been transferred. The interesting thing will be whether or not, this leads to more provocative North Korean behavior vis-à-vis the South and Japan, because they think they can get away with it because they have coverage from Russia. And will they start coordinating diplomatically, in response to the NATO threat, in response to, you know, the way that the war in Ukraine is going? Be interesting to watch. It's not what China wants to see, but that is certainly a piece of what happens when a couple of states considered pariahs and rogues by the West, are developing a real alliance.

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Hunter Biden's convictions won't derail his father's re-election bid
Hunter Biden's convictions won't derail his father's re-election bid | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60, live from the Toronto US-Canada Summit.

What are the implications of Hunter Biden's convictions for his father's presidential campaign?

You know, it's a little bit of tit for tat. You're going to see a lot of Republicans saying, “See the Biden crime family! Look at this guy. I mean, he's a convict.” It's ugly. It's embarrassing for the Biden family, of course. But at the same time, it's not very significant charges and it certainly doesn't link directly to President Biden. Five months away, are people going to be talking about this or Trump's 34 convictions, the weakest of the cases that he's actually facing? I suspect neither of them are going to matter very much, even though, on balance, Trump's is the one that should matter more.

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Will Ukrainian airstrikes inside Russia shift the war?
Will Ukrainian airstrikes inside Russia shift the war? | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

Will Ukrainian airstrikes inside Russia shift the war?

Possibly. They will make it harder, a lot harder for the Russians to take or advance on Kharkiv further, which is the second largest city in Ukraine, millions of people near the front lines. And if the Russians were to take it or destroy it, level it, you'd have millions of refugees that would be streaming out and into neighboring countries. Not something anyone in NATO wants to see. That is what is less likely to happen, because the Ukrainians can now hit Russian targeting outside of Ukraine.

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Trump trial: How would a conviction hurt his reelection bid?
| World In :60

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

How would a conviction in his hush money trial impact Trump in the 2024 election?

At least a little bit at the margins. And certainly that's the reason why Biden and the White House campaign are now working to pay attention to it, to get people down there in front of the courthouse where the media is located and talk about Trump as a criminal. Of course, could backfire on them, especially if it's a hung jury. But if he's convicted, while Republicans aren't going anywhere, there are a lot of independents that have consistently said that they are less willing to vote for Trump. Of course, this conviction comes in the lowest stake of the cases that are being presently pursued against the former president. This isn't the case on the insurrection and this isn't the case even on the classified documents being obscured, mishandled. And so as a consequence, I suspect at the end of the day, if you get a conviction, it's not going to matter much. But in a very, very close election, which is all about swing states and turnouts, it could hurt with getting independents to turn out for Trump.

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Iran without Raisi: What's next?
Iran without Raisi: What's next? | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

What's the fallout from the death of Iran's president?

Not that much in the near term because he doesn't actually run the country. There will be a new election in 50 days. It'll be a hardline or a loyalist to the Supreme Leader. Almost no one will turn out to vote because people don't see this as legitimate. But the country is still a strong and repressive theocracy and that is not changing with or without President Raisi.

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Xi invites Putin to China to strengthen "no limits" partnership
Putin visits Xi to continue "no-limit" relationship with China | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

Does Putin's upcoming visit with Xi Jinping signal a continuing “no limits” partnership between China and Russia?

The relationship is certainly becoming more strategic over time. Not so much because the Russians are changing their behavior. They have very few options at this point. North Korea and Iran are their top allies. Belarus, Syria. I mean, it's a rogues’ gallery, but China is increasingly finding that their ability to work long term in a stable and sustainable way with America's allies in Asia, with the Europeans, and with the United States itself becoming more constrained. And given all of that, willingness to be a closer ally with Russia is increasing over time. Just look at Biden putting 100% tariffs on Chinese electric vehicle exports. All of this is sending a message to the Chinese that no matter who's elected in November, that the US is trying to contain them. And yeah, I think longer term, the more they see that from the US and their allies, the closer with the Russians they will eventually be.

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With a Rafah invasion, is the Israel-Hamas cease-fire dead?
Rafah invasion: Did Israel violate any cease-fire agreement? | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

With Israel beginning its invasion of Rafah, is the recent Hamas agreed to cease-fire dead?

No. Though, of course, it was never really alive. Wasn't alive because the Israelis didn't agree to the terms that the Palestinians and Hamas did. But they are still negotiating and Israel's initial foray across the border to take over the crossing in Gaza is not, considered a redline, by the Americans, though it is disrupting humanitarian aid, and it's certainly not a full fledged invasion. So, I mean, again, escalation, lots of warnings, expectation that invasion is going to ensue quickly. But still a possibility that you get a short term cease-fire, a short term cease-fire. We'll see.

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