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Global Stage. GZERO and Eurasia Group in partnership with Microsoft
Presenting the issues at the intersection of technology, politics, and society.

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COP26 vibes so far: "What's it worth to save everything we have?"

What's the state of play so far at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow? Why is it so urgent to speed up climate action before it's too late? What does climate justice for developing nations really mean? And how can companies do their part without greenwashing? Several experts debated these and other questions during a Global Stage livestream conversation hosted by GZERO Media in partnership with Microsoft during the opening week of COP26, moderated by Eurasia Group senior adviser Diana Fox Carney.

Want to avoid greenwashing label? Go from targets to action, track progress, suggests Catherine McKenna

Everyone's talking about greenwashing at COP26. Why? For Catherine McKenna, Canada's former minister of Infrastructure and Communities, it's too easy to make commitments without having a process in place to deliver. Good words, she says, are no longer enough. "We need to understand how you're going to translate your targets into real action. And then we need to track that progress. That's exactly what governments need to do, but it's also what businesses need to do."

Africa needs reachable climate goals, says DRC lawmaker Jeanine Mabunda

Africa is barely responsible for today's climate crisis, yet African governments are being asked to stop using fossil fuels like everyone else. That just won't work, says DRC member of parliament and former speaker Jeanine Mabunda Lioko, unless rich nations make good on their climate finance pledges for the continent. Africa, she explains, needs "concrete and reachable goals" that provide access to reliable energy, and there will be a lot of pressure to deliver on promises ahead of the next COP climate summit, which will take place in an African country.

Why we need to put a price on carbon: University of Tokyo’s Naoko Ishii

If we are serious about doing the right thing on climate, only incentives to cut emissions simply won't cut it. Naoko Ishii, Director of Center for Global Commons, and Executive Vice President of the University of Tokyo, wants the carrot to be backed up by a stick in the form of a price on carbon that incorporates natural capital into economic policy. Once politicians do that, it'll be a lot easier for companies and individuals to see that further pollution will hurt our pockets as much as it harms the planet.

Want to land a "green job? 3 tips from LinkedIn

Upgrading your resume with some "green" skills to get a job in the future low-carbon economy? First, think long-term because whatever's good for you will be good for the planet, says Sue Duke, vice president and head of public policy at LinkedIn. Second, get training that aligns with your company's climate targets, and third, expand your network to make it "greener."

Highlights from UN General Assembly coverage

“Building back better”: UN General Assembly confronts the COVID-19 pandemic​

The United Nations marks its 75th anniversary this year amid the greatest global crisis since its founding. The UN's head of global communications Melissa Fleming explains the goals of this General Assembly, and how a renewed commitment to cooperation among nations could help eradicate COVID-19.

French Ambassador to UN: “Multilateralism has always been a challenge”

In an interview with Eurasia Group Vice Chairman Gerald Butts, Nicolas de Rivière cautions against an overly halcyon view of the UN's history. The Permanent Representative of France to the United Nations explains that throughout its 75 years the organization has confronted adversity. This moment is no exception, but "we have no other choice" than cooperation in order to address today's biggest crises, he explains. Rivière also discusses the global pandemic response, a need for greater commitments to climate action, and a recent move by the US to push for renewed sanctions against Iran.

Colombia’s President Iván Duque on early pandemic response: “Multilateralism didn’t work as it should”

In an interview with GZERO Media, Colombia's President Iván Duque discusses early missteps in global coordination on pandemic response that he feels exacerbated the spread of the virus. "If we all had acknowledged what was really going on in Asia, maybe we would have taken faster draconian measures to protect the world," he told Ian Bremmer.