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Brexit

David Miliband: Now that Boris Johnson has won a majority in the House of Commons, what's going to happen to Brexit?

If only Brexit could get done in 60 seconds? Because the result of the general election obviously means that Britain will leave the European Union, but it does nothing to clarify our future relations with the European Union. The Johnson victory is undoubtedly a very strong one, and he will try and interpret it as a victory for himself and for the Conservative Party and the attraction that they offer to Labour voters.

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William Hague: What is my prediction for the election?

Well, I think that conservatives will definitely have a bigger lead in votes over the Labour Party than at the last election, two years ago. Now that should give them a majority in the House of Commons. But then there will be tactical voting between Labour and Liberal voters against the Conservatives. And there are many undecided people at the last minute. So, I would go for a small conservative majority, maybe around 20 seats, which is also what some of the most sophisticated pollsters have said.

David Miliband: Who do you predict will win the UK elections?

I'm very careful about predictions, especially about the future, as someone famously said. The polls are pretty clear that this has been a dismal campaign, an unpopularity contest in all sorts of ways in which the lesser of two evils is perceived by the voters to be a conservative vote. So, the polls are giving a range of possibilities from a hung parliament right through to a large conservative majority. Obviously, I don't know who's going to win. My tour around the country last week gave me a real sense, a yearning really, for a better choice, for better choices, for more fronting up by the parties, because both parties have done a job of avoiding some of the hardest choices. And so, I predict that whoever wins, there are some very difficult choices ahead. And the sooner that politics is about what you're asking for as well as what you're offering. As Tawney said, after Labour lost the 1931 election, "we offered too much and asked too little." The sooner politics is about shared endeavor, the better for the country.

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What happens next, now that the Democrats unveiled two articles of impeachment against Trump?

Well, the Democrats vote almost unanimously, in all likelihood, to impeach Trump with no Republicans on board. And then he's acquitted by the Senate. Probably do get higher turnout from the Dems in 2020 because they're so angry about Trump with the failed impeachment.

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David Miliband: The question this week is whether the terrorist attacks last Friday will affect the outcome?

The short answer to that, I think, is no. I think the vast majority of British people will be thinking above all about their sympathy for the victims of the attack. Two people were killed and the extraordinary life stories that have been told about them really would make you cry for the loss that's been suffered by their family and frankly, been suffered by the whole country. I think that's to be uppermost in people's minds rather than the political facts or the political consequences.

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Lord William Hague:

What is the main difference between the manifestos, Conservative and Labour?

Obviously, a big difference is Brexit. The Conservatives say Brexit will happen on 31st of January. The Labour Party say, well, we'll have another referendum on Brexit, although we're not sure which side Jeremy Corbyn is gonna be on. But the big difference is on economics, the biggest we've ever seen between the two main parties.

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David Miliband:

The great thing about last night's general election debate was that the great British public rumbled at the weakest positions of all the parties. Boris Johnson, they laughed when he said that his fidelity to the truth could know no bounds, and Jeremy Corbyn, when he tried to say he had a clear policy on Brexit.

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William Hague: What's my prediction for the outcome of the election?

Well, we know we can't predict elections, of course, from my last few years in Britain or America. And this election could be like the last British election where the Labor Party really close the gap in the last three weeks. We've got four weeks to go. But on the whole, I think it probably won't be like that. That's because people do want to now resolve the Brexit situation. Most people in the country do. I think the conservatives will run a much better campaign than last time and they have done so far. Jeremy Corbyn isn't the novelty that he was at the last election, and people have decided they don't like him. And the Brexit party has pulled out half its candidates and that helps the conservatives more than Labour. So, at this point, I would predict a small conservative majority. And that would mean Brexit happens, 31st of January, 2020.

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