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People are carrying a banner with political phrases during a rally in support of Nicolas Maduro's campaign in San Cristobal, Venezuela, on July 10, 2024.

Jorge Mantilla/NurPhoto

As Venezuelans prepare to head for the polls on July 28, President Nicolas Maduro is pulling out all the stops to secure a third term in office and extend the Chavismo political movement’s 25-year grip on power. Chosen by the movement’s founder Hugo Chavez to succeed him as president, Maduro first won election in 2013 and has grown steadily more authoritarian.

Though Maduro pledged the coming election would be free and fair under the terms of the Norway-brokered “Barbados Agreement,” he has already reneged on some of its key terms. The agreement represents the latest in a series of attempts by the US and Latin American and European countries to encourage greater democratic opening in Venezuela.

We asked Eurasia Group expert Risa Grais-Targow what to expect from this weekend’s vote.

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Think you know what's going on around the world? Here's your chance to prove it.

With Donald Trump set to announce his vice presidential running mate in the coming days, we explore the possible contenders — and their viability.

UN Palestinian Ambassador Riyad Mansour urges Palestinian statehood as a path to peace
UN Palestinian Ambassador Riyad Mansour urges Palestinian statehood as a path to peace | GZERO World

On the season premiere of GZERO World's seventh season, Ian Bremmer sat down with Palestine's Permanent Observer to the UN Riyad Mansour to discuss the challenges of representing Palestinians at the United Nations, given the fact that Palestine is not recognized as a voting member. Mansour says the idea of Palestinian statehood being a security issue for Israel doesn’t make sense. He points out that Israel has fought Palestine for decades with tanks, soldiers, and weapons, which ultimately failed. What hasn’t been tried, he argues, is fully committing to a two-state solution and trying good-faith diplomacy instead of military force.

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Think you know what's going on around the world? Here's your chance to prove it.

British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak speaks during a Conservative general election campaign event, in London, on June 24, 2024.

REUTERS/Phil Noble/

Upcoming elections in France and the UK appear likely to deliver historic defeats for both countries’ ruling parties in a challenging electoral cycle for incumbents around the world. The polling shows the centrist alliance led by French President Emmanuel Macron’s Rennaissance party trailing both the far-right National Rally and the left-wing New Popular Front ahead of the legislative elections on June 30 and July 7 – pointing to an extremely difficult government formation process.

Meanwhile, the UK’s ruling Conservative party's dire polling ahead of the July 4 elections has prompted speculation of an “extinction event” that renders it virtually irrelevant in the next parliament. These votes follow others in countries including South Africa and India where the incumbents performed worse than expected.

What’s going on here? Eurasia Group expert Lindsay Newman says it’s a “long-COVID story” of the pandemic’s economic aftershocks fueling a political backlash. We asked her to explain.

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In the run-up to Thursday night’s presidential debate, we asked GZERO readers to play moderator and draft questions for the two main contenders, Joe Biden and Donald Trump. Some even took up the challenge of posing the toughest questions either candidate could face.

Our inbox was soon overflowing with thoughtful responses like these:

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Think you know what's going on around the world? Here's your chance to prove it.

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