Here's your quick breakdown of another baffling week for Brexit.

On Tuesday, lawmakers voted by a large margin (again) to reject Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit plan, adding yet more uncertainty ahead of Britain's scheduled departure date from the EU in two weeks.

On Wednesday, they voted to avoid an exit from the EU without a deal on the future of Britain's relationship with Europe. (That will be up to EU member states.)

On Thursday, they voted not to take control of the Brexit process from the prime minister. They also voted against a second Brexit referendum, in part because, the Labour Party leadership, which supports a second referendum, instructed its members that the timing isn't yet right. And then they voted to ask Europe for more time to decide what they want.

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Americans will be hearing the word socialism a lot over the next 21 months.

President Donald Trump believes that the emergence of some Democrats who embrace this label (in various forms) offers him a big political opening, just as the 2020 presidential election shifts into high gear. "We believe in the American dream, not the socialist nightmare," he recently told the Conservative Political Action Conference, an audience that responded with ecstatic applause.

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Over the next 11 weeks, there will be eight important elections globally covering populations of more than 2.2 billion people.

Here's what you need to know:

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The economic future of the UK – and the political future of PM Theresa May – (once again!) hang in the balance this week as British lawmakers take up three big Brexit votes.

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Being a US ally might soon get a lot more expensive. The Trump administration is reportedly preparing a plan that would force countries not only to pay for the full cost of hosting American troops on their territory, but also to pony up an additional 50 percent premium on that bill for the security that the US soldiers provide. Under those terms, some countries will pay as much as six times the amount they currently pay.

To put this in perspective, US troops are stationed in more than 100 countries around the world. There are 56,000 American soldiers in Japan, 35,000 in Germany, 28,500 in South Korea, 12,000 in Italy, and 9,000 in the UK.

The leak of this plan may merely be the opening bid in a series of tough negotiations, but let's take it at face value.

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In honor of International Women's Day, Ethiopian Airlines operated a flight this morning from Addis Ababa to Oslo with a flight crew, airport operations, flight dispatch, ramp operation, on-board logistics, safety, catering, and air-traffic control provided entirely by women, according to the airline's Facebook page.

Had we not missed the "last and final" call for this flight, the full Signal team would have been on board with our tray tables locked and our bags securely stowed in the overhead compartment. Not that this flight was a first. In the past, Ethiopian Airlines has offered flights with all-women crews to Bangkok, Kigali, Lagos, and Buenos Aires. Air India and British Airways have operated all-female flights, as well.

This week, we saw evidence that three of President Trump's signature policy plans so far haven't worked.

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Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un are back to sleeping in their own beds after their summit in Vietnam ended without an agreement. Trump is eager to emphasize that relations with Kim remain sunny. "This wasn't a walk away like you get up and walk out," he said. "No, this was very friendly. We shook hands," noted the president.

Two days later, how are the major players viewing the walkout in Hanoi?

Happy With How Things Went

China – Beijing wants the Korean Peninsula quiet, particularly as President Xi Jinping focuses on advancing trade talks with Trump. There's no American armada steaming toward trouble, no Korean rockets' red glare, and the two sides will keep talking.

Trump doubters – Some Americans, and US allies, feared Trump would offer Kim big concessions in exchange for vague promises. The president made clear he had no intention of doing that. Sanctions remain firmly in place.

Vietnam – Hanoi proved it could host a major international gathering on frighteningly short notice. The country's expanding economy and solid relations with the US offer a favorable contrast with North Korea.

Wary About What Comes Next

Japan – Fears that Trump would ease pressure without promises from Kim to scrap missiles that can hit Tokyo were not realized. But talks will continue at a lower level, and Japan will watch anxiously to see what comes next.

Unhappy With How Things Went

South Korea – President Moon needed a breakthrough to expand economic cooperation with the North, a key component of his domestic political agenda. The summit's failure forced him to call off a major announcement on the "Future of Korean Peace and Prosperity" he hoped would advance peace and boost his political standing.

Kim – If Kim was hoping Trump would give a lot to get a little, he left disappointed. So, what's plan B?

Trump – With so much trouble awaiting him back in Washington, Trump needed something he could sell as a major breakthrough. His refusal to move first will play well with North Korea skeptics, but Trump needed a big win to distract from the gathering storm back in Washington.

What's Next?

The summit's failure doesn't close the book on nuclear talks, but Trump's refusal to lift sanctions before Kim takes bigger steps leaves North Korea's leader with tough decisions on how to move forward. Though North Korea's foreign minister disputes Trump's account of what North Korea wanted and offered, Trump says Kim has promised to hold off on nuclear and ballistic missile tests to keep open the hope for future progress.

But there's nothing in writing. Kim could restart testing to try to force Trump to offer him something new. Or maybe he calculates that events in Washington ensure Trump won't be around much longer.