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What is COP26 and why does it matter?

UN climate summits have always carried hope that world leaders would use COPs to finally unite against climate change. But even when they succeeded, like in Paris 2015, climate activist Greta Thunberg says most of what comes out of the event is "blah, blah, blah" because we miss crucial targets to prevent global warming from 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. In fact, experts tell us that now we're heading toward a 3 degrees Celsius scenario, which would be catastrophic for both nature and humans. And if global cooperation has failed on vaccinations, why is climate going to be any different?

Watch this episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer: Surviving a warming planet

To save the oceans, refuse & raise awareness about single-use plastics, says Hannah Testa

We always hear about the "three Rs" — reduce, reuse, and recycle — of sustainable waste management. But when it comes to single-use plastics, climate activist Hannah Testa likes to add two more: refuse and raise awareness. What's more, she says it's crucial to connect the problem with climate by showing the damage that single-use plastic waste is doing to the oceans, the world's biggest carbon sink and whose health is a good temperature check on the entire planet.

Testa spoke during the second of a two-part Sustainability Leaders Summit livestream conversation sponsored by Suntory.

Can anyone lead the world on climate right now? Nope, says Kevin Rudd

For Kevin Rudd, former Australian PM and now CEO of the Asia Society, the science on climate change is pretty much done, so the only unresolved issues are tech and — more importantly — lack of political leadership. He can't think of a single national political leader who can fill the role, and says the only way to get political action on climate is to mobilize public opinion.

Rudd joined for the first of a two-part Sustainability Leaders Summit livestream conversation sponsored by Suntory. Watch here and register here to watch part two Friday 10/22 at 8 am ET.

Why should the UN listen to the private sector?

The UN is used to mostly dealing with governments, which represent member states, but they no longer monopolize power. That's why Secretary-General António Guterres says he also wants the private sector, cities, civil society, and especially youth to have a voice. In fact, young people make Guterres feel optimistic about the future, and he hopes that they'll continue waking up political leaders as citizens of the world.

Watch this episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer: UN Sec-Gen: Without trust, catastrophe awaits

UN Sec-Gen: Without trust, catastrophe awaits

António Guterres, the United Nations Secretary-General, does not mince words when it comes to the dire state of the world. "We are standing at the edge of an abyss," Guterres warns. COVID is "defeating" the global community and a climate catastrophe is all but assured without drastic action. Amidst this unprecedented peril, there remains a startling lack of trust among nations. And yet, there is still hope. In a frank (and in-person!) GZERO World interview, Ian Bremmer heads to the UN ahead of the annual General Assembly week to discuss COVID, climate, the US-China rift, and the ongoing crisis in Afghanistan.

How one Ugandan climate activist was literally “cropped out” of the climate conversation

24-year-old Ugandan climate activist Vanessa Nakate recounts how in 2020 she was cropped out of a photo at Davos of her with other white climate activists (like Greta Thunberg) and what it revealed about how people of color and people in developing countries, like those in Africa, are frequently excluded from the climate conversation.

Watch the episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer: Predictable disaster and the surprising history of shocks

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