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The Path to Holding Social Media Companies Accountable | GZERO World

The path to holding social media companies accountable

Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen thinks governments need to rethink how they regulate social media companies to hold them accountable for the consequences of their actions.

Instead of laws banning specific stuff, which lawyers are very good at skirting, governments should develop legislation that opens conversations about potential problems.

"That's an ongoing, flexible approach to trying to direct them back towards the common good," she tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

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Whistleblowers & How to Activate A New Era of Digital Accountability | Full Interview | GZERO World

Whistleblowers & how to activate a new era of digital accountability

Frances Haugen famously blew the whistle against her then-employer, Facebook. She says we must recognize that the gap between fast-changing tech and slow-moving governments will continue to widen, and the best way to narrow it, is to encourage people to speak out against questionable practices. These whistleblowers need better laws to protect them, she tells Ian Bremmer in a GZERO World interview.

Despite all of this, Haugen still has hope that the corporate culture inside tech companies can change for the better. The role of social media companies in politics is still growing, and now the failures of social media companies can have life-or-death consequences.

Haugen suggests that governments need to rethink how they regulate social media companies, and hold them more accountable for the consequences of their actions.

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Why Social Media Is Broken & How to Fix It | Frances Haugen | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Why social media is broken & how to fix it

Social media companies play an outsize role in global politics — from the US to Myanmar. And when they fail, their actions can cost lives.

That's why Frances Haugen blew the whistle against her then-employer, Facebook, when she felt the company hadn't done enough to stop an outrage-driven algorithm from spreading misinformation, hate, and even offline violence.

On GZERO World, Haugen tells Ian Bremmer why governments need to rethink how they regulate social media. A good example is the EU, whose new law mandating data transparency could have global ripple effects.

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Why EU Social Media Regulation Matters To You | GZERO World

What happens in Europe, doesn’t stay in Europe — why EU social media regulation matters to you

The EU just approved the Digital Services Act, which for the first time will mandate social media companies come clean about what they do with our data.

Okay, but perhaps you don't live there. Why should you care?

First, transparency matters, says Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen.

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The EU's Adoption of New DSA and DMA Proposals Indicate Prioritization | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

EU's proposed DSA and DMA laws would broadly regulate digital economy

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

What are the DSA and the DMA?

Well, the twin legislative initiatives of the Digital Services Act and the Digital Markets Act are the European Union's answer to the challenges of content moderation online and that of the significant role of major market players, also known as gatekeepers in the digital markets. And the intention is to foster both more competition and responsible behavior by tech companies. So the new rules would apply broadly to search engines, social media platforms, but also retail platforms and app stores.

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