Over the past 20 years, hundreds of millions of people in China have been pulled out of poverty by their country's staggering economic growth. Beijing today is a rising power on the global stage. That's all pretty great, and yet the country still ranks beneath war-torn Libya and perpetually melancholy Russia in the United Nations World Happiness Report. This week's Economist hazards a guess about what really makes people smile or scowl, but here's how China stacks up for joy against other countries.

Whoever wins Nigeria's election tomorrow will have a number of challenges to meet. Nigeria already has the world's largest population of people living in extreme poverty, and that number is set to soar over the next ten years. Here's how the outlook for extreme poverty reduction in Nigeria compares to several other countries.

The US and China bring different strengths to the contest for AI supremacy: America has an edge in private sector innovation and essential hardware like semiconductors. China has greater access to important types of data and is investing heavily to catch up elsewhere. Here's a scorecard of where the two global superpowers stand in developing this key new technology industry.

A high-stakes political trial in Spain threatens to reignite national tensions and topple the government. Here's fellow Signalista Gabe Lipton with the latest.

The "trial of the century," which began in Madrid yesterday, pits twelve members of the separatist movement in the Spanish region of Catalonia against the national government. The defendants are accused of rebellion, sedition, and civil disobedience for organizing what Madrid alleges was an illegal referendum on independence from Spain back in 2017. They face up to 25 years in prison.

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Venezuela is one of the most broken countries on Earth today. At the moment, two men claim to be president, and millions of people have fled amid one of the largest peacetime economic collapses in history.

So here's a question: assuming that the political crisis could be resolved – a big assumption, but work with us – what would it take to put the economy of Venezuela, once Latin America's wealthiest, back together again?

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President Trump's speech before a joint session of Congress last night was dominated by domestic issues, and he was careful to strike a conciliatory tone.

But foreign policy also made a few appearances – some subtle and others less so. Here's how we like to imagine leaders from the world's geopolitical hot spots received the president's speech.

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