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FILE PHOTO: Brazilian president Lula da Silva hugging Ursula von der Leyen the President of the European Commission at the 3rd EU-CELAC Summit in Brussels, Belgium on 17 July 2023.

Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Reuters

EU and Mercosur near trade deal (at last)

It has been a long four years since the free trade deal between Brussels and Latin America’s largest trade bloc was agreed in principle, but all sides now, finally, look close to signing on the dotted line.

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The World Trade Organization headquarters in Geneva.

REUTERS/Denis Balibouse

Viewpoint: US reversal on e-commerce rules will hurt global consumers

Last month’s surprise decision by the Office of the US Trade Representative to withdraw e-commerce proposals under discussion at the World Trade Organization is a new sign of growing US skepticism of free trade and the influence of big tech. The proposals, introduced by the US in 2019, aimed to establish rules protecting cross-border data flows and prohibiting national-level data localization requirements. We asked Xiaomeng Lu, a director of Eurasia Group’s geo-technology practice, to explain the consequences of the USTR’s reversal.
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How bananas demonstrate globalization
Ian Explains: How Bananas Demonstrate Globalization | GZERO World

How bananas demonstrate globalization

If globalization were a fruit, it might be a banana. But while bananas are still popular, globalization not as much lately.

In recent years, part of the pushback against globalization has been led by autocrats who reject things like free trade and the liberal international order.

For them, globalization means losing control, which they don't like one bit. But the world today remains more interconnected than ever, particularly in cyberspace.

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Paige Fusco

The Graphic Truth: Land borders crucial to trade

Hundreds of Canadian truckers angry about vaccine mandates have paralyzed Ottawa, the capital, for more than a week. They’ve blocked roads, honked their horns, and called for Trudeau’s resignation. Now, they have obstructed access to the Ambassador Bridge — a crucial artery connecting Detroit, Michigan, to Windsor, Ontario, that accommodates the transfer of more than a quarter of US-Canada annual trade worth a whopping $137 billion. Here’s a look of how this route compares with a few other major land trade routes.

GZERO Exclusive: Trudeau Defends Free Trade, Immigration and His Credibility Amidst Scandals

GZERO Exclusive: Trudeau Defends Free Trade, Immigration and His Credibility Amidst Scandals

As his reelection campaign reels in the wake of recently surfaced blackface and brownface images, Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau provided an exclusive response to GZERO Media's Ian Bremmer, host of the weekly foreign affairs program GZERO World.

In an email exchange transcribed below, PM Trudeau addressed the credibility gap the pictures and video from his past have created.

Ian Bremmer:How seriously can anyone take your passionate speeches on respect for diversity after seeing these images?

PM Justin Trudeau: Actions speak louder than words. I know that my actions in the past have been hurtful to people, and for that I'm deeply sorry. Our government has acted to fight discrimination and racism consistently over our first term, and if we earn the right to govern Canada again, we'll move forward to fight racism and discrimination in our next term.

Ian Bremmer:Can you remain credible on multiculturalism in Canada in light of this?

PM Justin Trudeau: That's for Canadians to judge. I will be spending the next few weeks working hard to earn their trust.

The exchange came following a new and wide-ranging interview Bremmer conducted in Canada's capital, Ottawa. As Canada approaches election day on October 21, the race is extremely close. His opponent, Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer, has capitalized on scandals and the diminishing popularity of some of Trudeau's signature policies—on immigration, trade, and the economy.

The complete, exclusive interview is featured on the next episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer, which airs nationwide on public television beginning this Friday, September 27. Their conversation is also the basis of the latest Time magazine international cover story, written by Ian Bremmer, about Trudeau's battle to defend his globalist agenda as populism rises abroad.

As poll numbers suggest Canadians are increasingly disenchanted with Trudeau's approach to the global refugee crisis, the Canadian leader stood firm in his assertion that a more diverse population will make his nation stronger. Trudeau also delivered pointed criticism of the current economic policies of U.S. President Donald Trump, calling them unsustainable.

"Inequality continues to grow everywhere around the world," he said. "But it's growing less in Canada than it is in the U.S., and that is because we made a decision to say, 'trickle down doesn't work.'"

GZERO WORLD with Ian Bremmer airs nationwide on public television Fridays beginning at 11 a.m. ET. Check local listings. The interview will also be published in full on gzeromedia.com on Monday, September 30, at 10 a.m. ET.

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