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Iran thrives on Arab "misery," says expert Karim Sadjadpour
Iran thrives on Arab despair | GZERO World

Iran thrives on Arab "misery," says expert Karim Sadjadpour

Whether it's Hamas in Gaza or Hezbollah in Lebanon or the Houthis in Yemen, how much control does Iran have over its proxy forces? According to Iran expert at the Carnegie Endowment for Peace, Karim Sadjadpour, Iran tends not to micromanage these groups. Iran may not typically give direct, day-to-day instructions but instead defer to these leaders to make their own decisions. However, Sadjadpour adds, on a broader level, Iran wields significant influence as they are often the primary source of funding and military support for these groups.

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Israel's war in Gaza has emboldened Iran, says Karim Sadjadpour
Israel's war in Gaza has emboldened Iran, says Karim Sadjadpour | GZERO World

Israel's war in Gaza has emboldened Iran, says Karim Sadjadpour

Since the 1979 Islamic Revolution, Iran's stance towards Israel and its Western allies has been nothing if not consistent, says Iran expert Karim Sadjadpour. In an extensive interview with Ian Bremmer for GZERO World, Sadjadpour emphasizes that Iran has consistently invested substantial resources in supporting militant groups like Hamas, Islamic Jihad, and Hezbollah in an effort to undermine Israel. It's a continuation of Iran's long-term strategy to challenge the existence of Israel.

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What’s Iran’s next move?
What’s Iran’s next move? | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

What’s Iran’s next move?

Remember that famous line from Bill Clinton’s campaign staffer James Carville back in 1992?: “It’s the economy, stupid!” As Israel’s war with Hamas escalates, it brings to mind—in a nasally Louisiana accent—the phrase “It’s Iran, stupid.”

Because, whether it’s the dizzying arsenal of Hezbollah rockets in southern Lebanon pointed at Israel, or the Houthi drones targeting Israel from Yemen, or the Iranian Revolutionary Guard facilities in Eastern Syria-, one thing is clear: all roads lead back to the Ayatollah. And yet, there’s a big difference between skirmishes with proxy forces and an all-out US/Israel war with Iran.

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A woman reacts during the funeral of a Palestinian who was killed during clashes following Israeli settlers' attack, near Ramallah.

REUTERS/Mohammed

Rare drone attack in the West Bank

For the first time in almost two decades, Israeli security officials used drones to target – and kill – Palestinian militants in the West Bank. Targeted in a moving car, the three men were said to be part of Palestinian Islamic Jihad and responsible for a recent series of shootings against Israeli Jews. This comes after Israel used a helicopter in a similar strike in the northern West Bank earlier this week.

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Israeli forces stand near the scene of a shooting attack in Neve Yaacov, Jerusalem

REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun

Deadly attack at Jerusalem synagogue

A Palestinian gunman opened fire near a synagogue in east Jerusalem on Friday night, killing seven Israelis, including a 70-year-old woman, and wounding three. The assailant was shot dead by police. The attack, one of the deadliest within Israel in recent years, punctuated a week of rising violence and came just a day after seven Palestinian gunmen and two civilians were killed during an Israeli Defense Forces raid in the West Bank refugee camp of Jenin, which targeted suspected terrorists. Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad vowed revenge, and subsequent rocket launches from the Gaza Strip were followed by limited Israeli strikes.

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Annie Gugliotta

What We're Watching: Biden's climate bill, Gaza ceasefire, Ukrainian nuclear jitters

US Senate passes Biden's big climate bill

Following a marathon vote-a-rama session that started late Saturday, the US Senate on Sunday passed a $740 billion package aimed at fighting climate change and lowering the cost of prescription drugs by raising certain corporate taxes. Although the legislation is a trimmed-down version of the Biden administration's doomed $3.5 trillion Build Back Better spending plan, it’s still the most ambitious climate legislation passed to date in America. Dubbed the “Inflation Reduction Act” — though economists doubt it'll live up to its name immediately — it allocates $369 billion for climate and clean energy investments, enables the government to negotiate some prescription drug prices, and slaps a 15% minimum tax on large corporations. Republicans say the tax hikes in the bill will kill jobs and spur inflation, but politically it's the latest in a series of victories for President Joe Biden at just the right time: three months ahead of November’s midterms. The legislation now heads to the House, where it is expected to be approved in a few days, before hitting Biden’s desk to be signed into law.

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