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Evaluating Data Privacy & Regulation in the US

How much regulation and oversight should the US government have when it comes to big tech? In an interview with Ian Bremmer for GZERO World, Marietje Schaake, former member of EU Parliament and international policy director of the Cyber Policy Center at Stanford University, argues that government relies on private tech firms for much of its own tech and data infrastructure, and that could be against the interest of citizens and consumers. Using examples of election security and misinformation promulgated in the COVID-19 pandemic, Schaake discusses the competing nature of profit-driven advertising platforms and the public good.

Marietje Schaake on Digital Data Rights

Marietje Schaake, former member of EU Parliament and international policy director of the Cyber Policy Center at Stanford University, discusses the regulation and oversight required to ensure that offline rights are protected in cyberspace as well, including the avoidance of microtargeting based on race, gender, or health status. In an interview with Ian Bremmer for GZERO World, she argues that fair competition, non-discrimination, and adherence to human rights laws are uneven and lacking in the online world.

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Surveillance vs privacy during the COVID-19 pandemic

In an interview with Ian Bremmer for GZERO World, Marietje Schaake, former member of EU Parliament and international policy director of the Cyber Policy Center at Stanford University, discusses the tradeoff between security and freedom when it comes to data surveillance. In a wide-ranging conversation about data and big tech, taped just days before cities entered lockdown in the United States, Schaake addresses early steps taken in Singapore and China to curb the spread of COVID-19 using tracking tools.

The complete discussion is part of the latest episode of GZERO World which airs on US public television. Check local listings.

Data Privacy Before and After a Pandemic

Some economists have argued that data is the new oil, a precious commodity driving exponential growth of some of the biggest multinational corporations. This week, our guest says it could also be the new CO2, quietly changing the world in irreparable ways if not properly controlled.

On the latest episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer, a look at the ongoing debate about data and how it's used by governments and big tech companies in ways both helpful and harmful. The policy conversation was complicated before COVID-19, as Europe established its General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the US begins to grapple with similar laws, like California's Consumer Privacy Act.

Our guest, Marietje Schaake, former EU Parliament Member and international policy director of Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, argues that more regulation is necessary to curb unchecked use of consumer data. Taped just days before many US cities entered lockdown in the COVID-19 pandemic, the interview also examines early uses of tracking and surveillance in Singapore and China, and what those actions foreshadow for the US as the nation balances freedom and security.

Later in the program, contact tracing and COVID-19: A conversation with epidemiologist John Brownstein about his site CovidNearYou.org.

And on Puppet Regime: Dating is hard during a pandemic. Even for pathogens on the prowl.

Marietje Schaake describes the trade-off between security and freedom under COVID-19

In an interview with Ian Bremmer for GZERO World, Marietje Schaake, former member of EU Parliament and international policy director of the Cyber Policy Center at Stanford University, discusses the tradeoff between security and freedom when it comes to data surveillance. In a wide-ranging conversation about data and big tech, taped just days before cities entered lockdown in the United States, Schaake addresses early steps taken in Singapore and China to curb the spread of COVID-19 using tracking tools. The complete discussion is part of the latest episode of GZERO World which begins airing Friday, May 8, on national public television. Check local listings.

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