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Illustration of the graves at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial after the US ceremony marking the 80th anniversary of the World War II D-Day Allied landings in Normandy, in Colleville-sur-Mer, France, on June 6, 2024.

Ammar Abd Rabbo/ABACAPRESS.COM via Reuters

From D-Day to E-Day: Legacy of the Longest Day

At 5:52 a.m. on June 6, 1944, Private First Class Gene Sellers, a high-school football star who had just received a scholarship to play at the University of Arkansas, leaped from a plane to parachute behind Nazi lines in Normandy, France. As part of the Pathfinder unit, Sellers’ job was to set up a covert radio and communications base to help guide the rest of the American troops who would follow hours later as part of Operation Overlord. Tragically, Sellers drifted too far behind enemy lines and was spotted and killed, becoming the first American casualty of D-Day.

Later that morning, on a nearby strip of coastline, Jim Parks,of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles, joined 21,000 other Canadians attempting to land at Juno Beach. They immediately came under heavy German fire, and Parks had to jump into the ocean.

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From tragedy to resilience: The story of Israel according to former PM Barak
From tragedy to resilience: The story of Israel according to former PM Barak | GZERO World

From tragedy to resilience: The story of Israel according to former PM Barak

What does it truly mean to give the ultimate sacrifice? And how can we give meaning to those who have made it?

These were questions that former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak delved into in a recent interview with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

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The cost of war: Senator Tammy Duckworth on what we owe veterans
The cost of war: Senator Tammy Duckworth on what we owe veterans | GZERO World

The cost of war: Senator Tammy Duckworth on what we owe veterans

The true cost of war is a lot more than tanks, helicopters, and ammunition, according to US Senator Tammy Duckworth (D-IL), who joins GZERO World to reflect on the 20th anniversary of the US-led invasion of Iraq. Duckworth was a helicopter pilot who lost both her legs in Iraq, one of thousands of veterans who returned home wounded, and intimately understands that the costs of war go far beyond the conflict ending.

Is the United States fulfilling its obligation to provide adequate services for its veterans? In a conversation with Ian Bremmer, Duckworth emphasizes “the obligation we have to our veterans” to live up to the promises we made to them. The United States made a deal with its veterans, she says, “to honor their service and sacrifices,” and it is “non-negotiable to break that promise.” Otherwise, how can we expect people to volunteer to serve?

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