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What We're Watching: Germany's next government taking shape

Who's going to run Germany? With coalition negotiations now reportedly in the home stretch, we could know what the next German government looks like as soon as Monday or Tuesday. Following elections that were held back in September, the center-left SPD, headed by Chancellor-in-waiting Olaf Scholz, has been hammering together a three-way coalition with the progressive Greens and the fiscal hawks of the Free Democrats Party. One big question mark is whether the spendthrift Greens or the tighter-pursestrings FDP will get the powerful finance ministry portfolio. Meanwhile, Green Party leader Annalena Baerbock is expected to become Germany's first female foreign minister, part of Scholz's larger pledge to ensure that the cabinet is split 50:50 between men and women.

German Election Campaign Full of Drama and Uncertainty | Europe In :60 | GZERO Media

German election campaign full of drama and uncertainty

Carl Bildt, former Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Sweden, shares his perspective from Europe:

What is the outlook for the upcoming German election?

Well, that's a dramatic election campaign if you have ever seen one. We've seen the CDU, the main governing - the Merkel party, their candidate has been faltering quite heavily. You see the SPD candidate presenting himself as the responsible successor to Merkel. And we are going to have an election night that's going to be highly uncertain with a number of options open for which kind of government will be in Germany for the next four years. But days left to go, so lots of drama ahead.

Annalena Baerbock, co-chairperson of Buendnis 90/Die Gruenen (Alliance 90/The Greens), speaks during the Greens Political Ash Wednesday.

DPA/Reuters

Is Germany turning Green?

A Green Party-led government for the world's fourth largest economy? That's no longer far-fetched. As Signal's Gabrielle Debinski wrote last month, most current polls now show Germany's Greens in first place in federal elections set for September 26. And for the first time, the Greens have a candidate for chancellor. Annalena Baerbock is vying to replace Angela Merkel, who has led Germany for the past 16 years.

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Is it the Greens' moment in Europe?

Europe has been hit by a green wave in recent years. Green parties in countries as varied as Germany, Belgium, France, Ireland, Finland, and Sweden have made sizable electoral gains, with some now sitting in national governments.

The Green phenomenon seems to be gaining yet more momentum in the lead up to some crucial European elections (Germany, France) in the months ahead. What explains the green shift, and where might this trend be headed?

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