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Is Hezbollah Losing Influence in Lebanon? Kim Ghattas on Lebanese Divisions & Unity | GZERO World

Is Hezbollah losing influence in Lebanon? Kim Ghattas on Lebanese divisions & unity

Some of the worst sectarian clashes since Lebanon's 15-year civil war (1975-1990) broke out in Beirut this week between supporters of Hezbollah and Amal, both Shiite political parties, and Christian, far-right Lebanese Forces. Shiite protesters were rallying against the state probe into the Beirut port blast, which occurred last year. They say authorities were singling out Shiite politicians for questioning and blame. In this video, watch Ian Bremmer's conversation with Lebanese journalist and author Kim Ghattas on GZW talking about the future of Lebanese politics and sectarianism in the county after the after the blast. It was originally published on August 19, 2020.

In Lebanon, "a majority (are) united in wanting a different future, a future that is non-sectarian, that is non-corrupt, that provides prosperity, justice, dignity for people," journalist Kim Ghattas told Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

In this interview, Ghattas discusses the opportunity that could arise from the tragedy of the Beirut explosion which killed 200 and injured thousands more. The Lebanese are "fed up" with the militant group Hezbollah, she tells Bremmer, and want to strive for a government that better resembles the diversity and cosmopolitan nature of its citizens.

Watch the GZERO World episode: Lebanon Post-Blast: Rage in the Streets of Beirut.

A Story from Lebanon | Rewarding Acts of Kindness In Beirut | GZERO World

A story from Lebanon: rewarding acts of kindness in Beirut

A Lebanese social media project goes viral with a simple message: The world sucks. Make it better.

Watch the GZERO World episode: Is the US Misjudging the Middle East's Power Shifts? Vali Nasr's View

Remembering the West, Texas Explosion of April, 2013 | Support for Beirut | GZERO World

Beirut Blast a Painful Reminder for Small Texas Town

In 2013, a blast at a fertilizer plant in West, Texas nearly leveled the town and killed 15 people. The cause--an explosion of the chemical ammonium nitrate, the same substance involved in the tragic blast that occurred recently in Beirut, Lebanon. GZERO Media traveled to West, Texas, to meet Mayor Tommy Muska. Hear his harrowing story, and his words of support for a city thousands of miles away.

Watch the GZERO World episode: Lebanon Post-Blast: Rage in the Streets of Beirut

Lebanon Post-Blast: Rage in the Streets of Beirut | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Lebanon post-blast: rage in the streets of Beirut

It was a blast heard around the world, an explosion so big it literally sent shockwaves through the streets of Beirut. More than 200 were killed, thousands injured, and hundreds of thousands left homeless. On this episode of GZERO World, Ian Bremmer examines the aftermath and fallout of the catastrophe in Lebanon, a nation that was already aflame in political turmoil. Ian Bremmer talks to acclaimed journalist Kim Ghattas, author of Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry That Unraveled Culture, Religion, and Collective Memory in the Middle East, about the road ahead for Lebanon and how this moment could impact the region.

Podcast: Lebanon Post-Blast: Rage in the Streets of Beirut


It was a blast heard around the world, an explosion so big it literally sent shockwaves through the streets of Beirut. More than 200 were killed, thousands injured, and hundreds of thousands left homeless. On this GZERO World podcast, Ian Bremmer examines the aftermath and fallout of the catastrophe in Lebanon, a nation that was already aflame in political turmoil. Ian Bremmer talks to acclaimed journalist Kim Ghattas, author of Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry That Unraveled Culture, Religion, and Collective Memory in the Middle East, about the road ahead for Lebanon and how this moment could impact the region.

Deadly Beirut Explosion: First-Hand Account from Lebanese Journalist Kim Ghattas | GZERO World

Deadly Beirut explosion: a first-hand account from a Lebanese journalist

Just days after an explosion tore through the heart of Beirut on August 4, journalist and born-and-raised resident Kim Ghattas described where she was when the blast happened, some of the unanswered questions - and what she thinks was the cause.

This episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer begins airing Friday, August 14 on US public television. Check local listings.

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