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Impact of Microsoft hack deepens; why cyber attacks target healthcare

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford University's Cyber Policy Center and former European Parliamentarian, shares insights on the latest news about big tech, privacy protection and emerging trends in cyberspace.

What is the deal with the recently revealed Microsoft hack?

Well, it's the second hack of historic proportions after SolarWinds. At first, it was considered a targeted Chinese effort to go after individuals critical to the state. But last week we saw escalations with victims now estimated in the tens, if not hundreds of thousands. And the US government CISA called on all organizations in all sectors to follow guidance and to patch the vulnerabilities that are being exploited, even if that does not stop already gained access by hackers.

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Why the US was unprepared for the 2020 cyber breach

They call it Einstein. It's the multibillion-dollar digital defense system the US has used to catch outside hackers and attackers since 2003. But it was no match for what's looking like one of the biggest cyber breaches in US history. Ian Bremmer breaks it down.

Watch the GZERO World episode: Cyber attack: an act of espionage or war?

Russian cyber attack: How should the Biden administration respond?

How should the incoming Biden administration respond to Russia's unprecedented cyber attack on American government institutions and corporations? "Governments really don't like it when you sanction their people," says former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson. Sanctions are just one of a variety of response measures that Johnson explores with Ian Bremmer. Their conversation was part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Assessing the damage from the Russian cyber attack

Experts are still trying to assess the scope of Russia's cyber attack against the United States. But even without all the details in, former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson provides a sense of the damage: "If one assumes that this was espionage, then the Russians know a lot more about people like you and me or people in government or our capabilities or what we are talking about within government or within some of the more sophisticated elements of the private sector." Johnson's conversation with Ian Bremmer was part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Russia’s cyber attack: an act of espionage or war?

This week's pro-Trump rampage on the Capitol was an attack on the citadel of American democracy. But the United States was already reeling from another kind of assault, an unprecedented cyber attack on US government agencies and major American companies, very likely perpetrated by Russia. Former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson spent years trying to protect the United States against such an attack and he joins GZERO World to take stock of what we know—and what we don't—at this point. He also raises a fundamental question: At what point should we view such a breach as more than just high-tech espionage? When does it constitute an act of war?

Podcast: Russia's Cyber Attack: An Act of Espionage or War? Jeh Johnson's Perspective

Listen: Former US Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson spent years trying to protect the United States against the kind of massive cyber attack that Russia carried out against American businesses and government agencies in the last year. But at what point should we view such a breach as more than a remarkable feat of espionage? When does it constitute an act of war? Johnson joins Ian Bremmer to discuss.

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.

Quick Take: US stimulus, vaccine rollout, & Russian cyber espionage

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Hi, everybody. It's Christmas week. God, we need it. Great to see you and a little quick take to kick us off this last full week of 2020, getting through on fumes this most, most challenging year. First, obviously happy to finally see a deal come through almost a trillion dollars in relief that is desperately needed in the United States. People complaining that $600 checks aren't going to do very much. And I agree, it's kind of pathetic, especially in the context of what other advanced industrial democracies have been doing for their working populations around the world, but it's better than zero, which is where we were.

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Trump will use election fraud claims to stay relevant through 2021

Get insights on the latest news in US politics from Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington:

The Electoral College has voted. Why is Trump still refusing to acknowledge defeat?

Well, the President has a long history of criticizing people who lose elections as losers, who quote, "choke like a dog." And I don't think the President wants to admit to himself that he is a loser who choked like a dog. In addition, he's building a pretty impressive political operation based off claims that the election was stolen from him. He's raised over $200 million in the month since the election, and that political operation is going to keep him relevant in the media and in Republican politics for at least the rest of 2021. I think that the claims of election fraud are really central to that operation. So, don't expect Trump to concede anytime soon, even after Republicans start broadly acknowledging his loss.

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