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Podcast: Can governments protect us from dangerous software bugs?


Transcript

Listen: We've probably all felt the slight annoyance at prompts we receive to update our devices. But these updates deliver vital patches to our software, protecting us from bad actors. Governments around the world are increasingly interested in monitoring when dangerous bugs are discovered as a means to protect citizens. But would such regulation have the intended effect?

In season 2, episode 5 of Patching the System, we focus on the international system of bringing peace and security online. In this episode, we look at how software vulnerabilities are discovered and reported, what government regulators can and can't do, and the strength of a coordinated disclosure process, among other solutions.

Our participants are:

  • Dustin Childs, Head of Threat Awareness at the Zero Day Initiative at Trend Micro
  • Serge Droz from the Forum of Incident Response and Security Teams (FIRST)
  • Ali Wyne, Eurasia Group Senior Analyst (moderator)
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Podcast: Would the proposed UN Cybercrime Treaty hurt more than it helps?

Transcript

Listen: As the world of cybercrime continues to expand, it follows suit that more international legal standards should follow. But while many governments around the globe see a need for a cybercrime treaty to set a standard, a current proposal on the table at the United Nations is raising concerns among private companies and nonprofit organizations alike. There are fears it covers too broad a scope of crime and could fail to protect free speech and other human rights across borders while not actually having the intended effect of combatting cybercrime.

In season 2, episode 4 of Patching the System, we focus on the international system of online peace and security. In this episode, we hear about provisions currently included in the proposed Russia-sponsored UN cybercrime treaty as deliberations continue - and why they might cause more problems than they solve.

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Podcast: Foreign influence, cyberspace, and geopolitics

Transcript

Listen: Thanks to advancing technology like artificial intelligence and deep fakes, governments can increasingly use the online world to spread misinformation and influence foreign citizens and governments - as well as citizens at home. At the same time, governments and private companies are working hard to detect these campaigns and protect against them while upholding ideals like free speech and privacy.

In season 2, episode 3 of Patching the System, we're focusing on the international system of bringing peace and security online. In this episode, we look at the world of foreign influence operations and how policymakers are adapting.

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Podcast: Cyber mercenaries and the global surveillance-for-hire market

Transcript

Listen: The use of mercenaries is nothing new in kinetic warfare, but they are becoming a growing threat in cyberspace as well. The weapon of choice for cyber mercenaries is malicious spyware that undermines otherwise benign technologies and can be sold for profit. Luckily, awareness about this threat is also growing, and increasing global coordination efforts are being put forth to combat this dangerous trend.

In episode 2, season 2 of Patching the System, we're focusing on the international system of bringing peace and security online. In this episode, we look at what governments and private enterprises are doing to combat the growth of the cyber mercenary industry.

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Podcast: How cyber diplomacy is protecting the world from online threats

Transcript

Listen: Just as bank robbers have moved from physical banks to the online world, those fighting crime are also increasingly engaged in the digital realm. Enter the world of the cyber diplomat, a growing force in international relations specifically focused on creating a more just and safe cyberspace.

In season 2 of Patching the System, we're focusing on the international systems and organizations of bringing peace and security online. In this episode, we're discussing the role of cyber diplomats, the threats they are combatting, and how they work with public and private sectors to accomplish their goals.

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Hackers, innovation, malice & cybercrime
The Cyber Threat Ain't Going Away | GZERO World

Hackers, innovation, malice & cybercrime

In the 1950s, "phreakers" whistled their ways into free long-distance calls. Steve Wozniak then improved on the scam, making enough cash to get Apple started along with Steve Jobs.

Many of today's hackers are also bored kids trying to beat the system and make a quick buck in the process. But they can also do more sinister things, Ian Bremmer tells GZERO World.

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How private businesses help fight cybercrime
How Private Businesses Help Fight Cybercrime | GZERO World

How private businesses help fight cybercrime

The federal government wants to help US businesses better defend themselves against cyberattacks — but little can be done if corporations don't report them.

That's why the Biden administration is championing a new law that forces them to do so, says Jen Easterly, head of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency.

The Cyber Incident Reporting for Critical Infrastructure Act requires whoever operates critical infrastructure to report attacks coming from state and non-state actors.

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Podcast: A cybercrime treaty proposed by…Russia?

Transcript

Listen: Cybercrime is a rapidly growing threat, and one that will require a global effort to combat. But could some of the same measures taken to fight criminals online lead to human rights abuses and a curtailing of freedom?

As the United Nations debates a new and expansive cybercrime treaty first proposed by Russia, we’re examining the details of the plan, how feasible it would be to find consensus, and what potential dangers await if the treaty is misused by authoritarian governments.

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