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US-EU tensions aren't just a Trump problem

"Many European diplomats are already infatuated with Biden," a US-based analyst wrote in May about the so-called revival of the transatlantic relationship. Well, that assessment seems to have aged as well as an overripe banana.

This week, the EU advised member states to restrict travel from the US because of America's rising COVID infection rate. While that may be true, it could also be, at least in part, a retaliatory move: Brussels is furious that the Biden administration has refused to allow most Europeans to enter the country for 18 months, despite the bloc now having vaccinated more adults than the US.

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Europe in "shock & disbelief" over US withdrawal from Afghanistan

Carl Bildt, former Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Sweden, shares his perspective from Europe:

What has been the European reaction to what's happening in Afghanistan?

Well, I think shock and disbelief is the appropriate expression for it. Shock and disbelief over the Americans just cutting out running, although you might argue that we should have seen it coming. And then, of course, a lot of long-term questions that will play out over time. Can the United States be relied upon, right or wrong? That question is going to linger for quite some time.

Are the EU nations prepared to accept Afghan refugees?

Well, the priority at the moment must of course be those that have worked for our forces, our development efforts, our embassies, and to get them out. As otherwise, Europe already has a substantial number, as a matter-of-fact Afghans are the number one nation when it comes to regular migration. Last year our figures for 2020 was 34,000 coming in. There are nearly 150,000 of them in Germany, there are 30,000 in Sweden. This is to compare with single digit thousand numbers in the US. So there will be an enormous effort to try to help displaced refugees in the region, and then the somewhat more managed global handling of the refugee issue will be called for.

Biden looks to Europe (and beyond) for help to contain China

Former US ambassador Ivo Daalder calls Biden the "most Atlanticist" president since George HW Bush. Daalder defines Atlanticism as looking towards Europe first when problems arise. Getting not only the Europeans but also Asian leaders on board is vital in order for Biden to stand up to China effectively, Daalder tells Ian Bremmer in an interview on GZERO World. "It's no longer enough to be Atlanticist. You can't do your entire foreign policy engagement only with Europe. What you really need is you need a Northern American, Asian, European advanced democratic alignment."

Watch the GZERO World episode: Has Biden convinced the G7 "America is back"?

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