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How will the global corporate tax deal impact tech companies?

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

Will the OECD-brokered global corporate tax deal make a difference?

Well, it should, at least in two years, once it is adopted by the 136 countries that have now agreed to it. Once enforced, a minimum contribution would see approximately $125 billion flowing to public purses where it doesn't today. It would make it harder for countries to be tax havens or to be part of this race to the bottom when it comes to tax rates. It puts a limit on competition between countries but that is still possible. Now, public scrutiny over the corporate sector has intensified over the past years and with a whole host of issues like health care, climate change, and infrastructure begging for better solutions, there is a need for fair taxation that is widely supported, both publicly and now also politically.

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What We're Watching: A year since George Floyd, G7 corporate tax, Samoa's political crisis

Marking a year since George Floyd's murder: May 25 marks one year since the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, which galvanized the biggest anti-racism movement in America in generations – and inspired a global reckoning with racial inequality and policing in dozens of countries around the world. Since then, former police officer Derek Chauvin has been charged with Floyd's murder, a historic development after decades of near-total impunity for police who use excessive force against Black Americans. But many say that Chauvin's' conviction is not enough and are calling for the passage of broad police reform legislation in the US Congress. While the House of Representatives passed the George Floyd Police Reform Act, the bill in its current form doesn't appear to have sufficient support to pass in the Senate. One of the biggest sticking points in the bill is over "qualified immunity," which protects government officials and law enforcement from being held personally liable for constitutional violations. Republicans oppose this structural reform, but even if they come to an agreement in the Senate, progressive House Democrats say they will not accept a watered-down version that does not eliminate this provision in at least some instances. Meanwhile, President Biden will host the Floyd family at the White House on Tuesday.

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