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Luisa Vieira

Resilience in an era of crisis

We live in an era of emergency. Since 2008, we’ve seen a global financial crisis, a sovereign debt crisis in Europe, and a wave of unrest that sparked political turmoil across North Africa and the Middle East. Civil wars in Syria and Libya helped trigger a migrant crisis that upended European politics. Then came Britain’s exit from the EU, the surprise election of a US president who upended the most basic assumptions about America’s role in the post-war world, and a political crisis in the wake of his defeat. Next came a global pandemic that has killed millions and continues to inflict human, economic, and political damage in every region of the world. Now we have Russia’s war on Ukraine, millions more refugees, and a global food emergency that has only just begun. All of that has happened in the past 14 years.

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Using Today’s Crises to Fix Tomorrow’s Problems | GZERO World

Using today's crises to fix tomorrow's problems

We're moving toward more illiberalism, zero trust in the US-China relationship, and other global crises. Are there any reasons for hope?

Not for political scientist and Harvard professor Stephen Walt, who believes we can't tackle all these crises at the same time — otherwise, at some point people will just throw up their hands and say it's just too hard.

What's more, he tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World, when a crisis hits, the temptation to turn to strongman rule to fix the problem "goes way up."

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Ousted Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan travels on a vehicle to lead a protest march in Islamabad, Pakistan.

REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

What We're Watching: Imran Khan's threat, a looming global recession, Bolsonaro-Biden meeting

Imran Khan issues dangerous ultimatum

Pakistan’s former Prime Minister Imran Khan – booted from the top job last month by a parliamentary no-confidence vote – has called on the country’s nascent government to hold new elections within six days or risk full-blown social upheaval. For weeks, Khan has been whipping supporters of his Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf Party into a frenzy, saying his ouster was perniciously orchestrated by Washington in conjunction with the newly minted PM Shehbaz Sharif. (Khan, of course, fails to acknowledge that his removal was in large part a reflection of dissatisfaction with the country’s imploding economy and dwindling foreign reserves.) Things got really bad this week when Khan led his supporters in a march from his home turf of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province toward Islamabad. As throngs of angry PTI supporters tried to reach the capital, violent clashes with police ensued in multiple cities. The Supreme Court ordered police to remove barriers on highways that were preventing pro-Khan protesters from reaching Islamabad but said that protests in the capital needed to be confined to a specific area. That didn’t happen, and police responded to the violence and disorder with tear gas. This turmoil comes as Sharif is trying to convince the International Monetary Fund that Pakistan has gotten its act together to get funding back on track. Khan isn’t backing down, and the next week could be deadly.

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Want to help poor countries now? Open your markets to their farmers | Global Stage | GZERO Media

Want to help poor countries now? Open your markets to their farmers, World Bank chief tells wealthy nations

Many developing countries now face high inflation, especially rising food prices.

What can they do to alleviate some of that pain? Wealthy nations should step in by opening their markets to farmers from poor nations, World Bank President David Malpass says during a Global Stage livestream conversation hosted by GZERO Media in partnership with Microsoft.

"This is a moment to make friends, to help people that ... don't have as much."

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S3 Episode 1: If the economy is good, why do I feel so bad?


Listen: Last year the US economy grew 5.7%, the biggest growth rate in decades, yet at the beginning of 2022 fewer than 1 in 5 Americans thought it was strong. And as the world confronts the converging crises of pandemic and war in Ukraine, inflation and skyrocketing prices are further contributing to feelings of financial insecurity.

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Want Small Businesses to Succeed? Enable Them As Problem-Solvers | GZERO Media

Want small businesses to succeed? Enable them as problem-solvers

After the 2008/2009 Great Recession, it took a decade for US small businesses to really start growing. But only about four months after COVID hit. Why?

Tom Sullivan, VP for VP of Small Business Policy at the US Chamber of Commerce, gave two reasons during a livestream conversation on small businesses and post-pandemic recovery hosted by GZERO Media in partnership with Visa.

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Should Small Businesses Embrace Public-Private Partners? | GZERO Media

Should small businesses embrace public-private partners?

Definitely, says Kiva CEO Chris Tsakalakis.

"No one individual or one group can fund what needs to get done in order to support these businesses," he says during a livestream conversation on small businesses and pandemic recovery hosted by GZERO Media in partnership with Visa.

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Visa’s Jeni Mundy: Digitizing Will Help Small Businesses “Thrive” After COVID | GZERO Media

Visa's Jeni Mundy: Digitizing will help small businesses "thrive" after COVID

Digitalization helped small businesses survive through the pandemic. Now, it'll make them "thrive," according to Jeni Mundy, Visa's global SVP for Merchant Sales & Acquiring.

She's upbeat about the future. "Small businesses are feeling optimistic ... so [there are] reasons to feel positive," Mundy says during a livestream conversation on small businesses and pandemic recovery hosted by GZERO Media in partnership with Visa.

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