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Myanmar is a danger to its neighbors — will anyone step in?

Remember Myanmar? It's been over five months since the military — the Tatmadaw — seized power in a coup, sidelining the quasi-democratic civilian government led by former human rights icon Aung San Suu Kyi. Anti-coup demonstrations quickly arose around the country, and the Tatmadaw tried to put them down just as swiftly, responding with brutal violence that killed over 800 civilians.

And although the media has largely moved on, the situation is getting worse in ways that aren't only bad for Myanmar's people, but also for its neighbors.

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Quick Take: Myanmar’s military coup is nothing like the US insurrection

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Hi, everybody. Ian Bremmer here. I've got your Quick Take kicking off the week. Plenty of things we could talk about, but I thought we would actually discuss Myanmar, because it's not generally something in the news. And yet just this weekend, we had a successful military coup and immediately of course you see Americans say, "Hey, that's just like what happened in the United States, could have been us." And the answer is no, no. What happened in the US was an insurrection that failed, but it was not a coup and the reason it was not a coup is because the military played absolutely no role. In fact, all of the former secretaries of defense said that Democrat and Republican, that it was a free and fair election, and that Biden was going to be president. That needed to be respected. The joint chiefs wrote their letter together saying that it was critical to stand for the constitution.

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Myanmar generals turn back the clock

After weeks of saber-rattling, Myanmar's military took power on Monday. Aung San Suu Kyi and the entire leadership of her incumbent National League for Democracy party are now under arrest. The coup ends a five-year democratic experiment in a country where generals are used to calling the shots.

How did we get here, why was democracy so short-lived, and what happens next?

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'R' is for Rohingya: Sesame Street creates new muppets for refugees

December 21, 2020 12:50 AM

BANGKOK (NYTIMES) - Six-year-old twins Noor and Aziz live in the largest refugee camp in the world. They are Rohingya Muslims who escaped ethnic cleansing in their native Myanmar for refuge in neighboring Bangladesh. They are also Muppets.

Bangladesh ships Rohingya refugees to remote island despite protests

December 04, 2020 1:07 PM

Bangladesh says it is only moving refugees who are willing to go and that this will ease chronic overcrowding in camps.

Bangladesh begins transfer of Rohingya to controversial island

December 03, 2020 4:07 PM

COX'S BAZAR (AFP) - Bangladesh began transferring several hundred Rohingya refugees on Thursday (Dec 3) to what the UN and rights groups worry is a dangerous low-lying island prone to cyclones and floods.

Myanmar vote ban extinguishes hope for ethnic minorities

October 25, 2020 5:00 AM

YANGON • For many marginalised ethnic minority groups in conflict-plagued regions of Myanmar, next month's national elections had at least offered a glimmer of hope for empowerment.

Indonesia in good position to revive world pressure on Myanmar: Jakarta Post contributor

September 21, 2020 1:10 PM

In the article, the writer says that what's needed is effective interaction between the United Nations (UN) secretary-general, the UN special rapporteur for Myanmar and the secretary general's special envoy for Myanmar.

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