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Back to Divided Government: Biden's Silver Lining From a Republican House | GZERO World

Back to divided government: Biden's silver lining from a Republican House

The GOP was gearing up for a red wave in the US midterms. But in the end, it was just a ripple, and while the Republicans narrowly won the House Democrats kept the Senate.

Why? Democrats turned out more voters worried about democracy and abortion, NPR's White House correspondent Tamara Keith tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Divided government with such tight margins, she says, now means two things. First, nothing much is going to get done in Congress for two years.

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US Democracy After US Midterms: Polarized Voters & Trump's GOP | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

US democracy after US midterms: polarized voters & Trump's GOP

What happened in the US midterm elections is becoming clear: the red wave-turned-ripple was only enough for Republicans to narrowly win the House, while the Democrats kept the Senate. But 'why' it happened is a harder question to answer.

On GZERO World, NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith speaks to Ian Bremmer about all things midterms.

Her take on what saved the Dems? Abortion rights and protecting democracy turned out voters.

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How Social Media Harms Democracy | Asia Society | GZERO Media

How social media harms democracy

Yes, foreign powers have tried to meddle in US elections. But for Ian Bremmer, external disinformation efforts pale in comparison to the internal damage Americans can do.

What's more, under its new ownership Twitter is so far unleashing more anger, hatred, and violence on social media, Bremmer says during a conversation with former Australian PM and Asia Society President and CEO Kevin Rudd at the Asia Society's headquarters in New York.

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Political Violence Getting Normalized in the US | World In :60 | GZERO Media

Who cares if Elon Musk bought Twitter?

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

Might Congress take actions against members of Congress who play down threats for political reasons?

I suspect not. Obviously very disturbing that we are so tribal, we are so polarized that when you see political violence against people like Nancy Pelosi, the Paul Pelosi thing, knocked unconscious by a hammer, a guy goes into his house... And Gabby Giffords and Steve Scalise. This is getting normalized in the United States, and it should never be normalized. And in part it is because if it doesn't happen to your side, you don't pay attention to it. It's not such a big deal. That's not where the country needs to be, but it is where we are presently given just how dysfunctional this feeling of, "If you're not with me, you're my enemy," politically inside the United States. This is a natural impact of that occurring.

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Roe v. Wade Overturned: Abortion Restricted in Half of US States | GZERO World

Roe v. Wade overturned: Abortion restricted in half of US states

Now that the US Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, roughly half the states have legislation on the books restricting abortion.

And 13 of them had "trigger laws" to ban abortion once the 1973 ruling was struck down. Residents of those states seeking abortions must now travel across state lines to get an abortion — and Missouri wants to sue those who do.

What's more, it'll be a long drive: an average of 125 miles, compared to just 25 when Roe was still the law of the land, Ian Bremmer explains on GZERO World.

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Politicized SCOTUS Losing Legitimacy After Roe v. Wade Reversal | Quick Take | GZERO Media

Politicized SCOTUS losing legitimacy after Roe v. Wade reversal

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Hi, everybody. Ian Bremmer here. A Quick Take for you on the back of this landmark ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States to overturn Roe v. Wade. For 50 years now, abortion until the viability of the fetus, around 23 weeks of pregnancy, has been legal in the entirety of the United States. That ends today.

Important to look at how Americans view abortion. It's actually a very mixed picture, depending on the question that you ask. Almost all Americans, about 90%, believe that abortion should be legal in some circumstances and not in others. So, I mean, frankly broadly the compromise that's been the law of the land for the last 50 years hasn't been completely happy for anyone, but has been generally a position that most of the population could get behind. A strong majority of Democrats and Republicans do agree with that formulation, that abortion should be legal in some circumstances and illegal in other circumstances.

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Victory for US Conservatives: Roe Overturned | US Politics : 60 | GZERO Media

Victory for US conservatives: Roe v. Wade overturned by SCOTUS

Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, shares his perspective on US politics:

What will be the immediate impact of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?

This week's decision is the culmination of 40 years of work by the conservative legal movement to create the alignment of justices willing to make this choice, which ironically came together during the presidency of Donald Trump, who, for most of his career, was not a conservative Republican. Abortion could become a relevant issue in the midterm elections, but surveys are showing that most voters are much more activated by the economy at the moment than abortion. That could change however as there's going to be a movement in states to either deny or preserve access to abortion, which could put the issue on the ballot in places like Pennsylvania, Michigan, Arizona and Georgia.

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US Politics Are More Prone to Misinformation, Says Former Danish PM | Global Stage | GZERO Media

US politics are prone to misinformation, says former Danish PM

Why has Europe been less affected by online misinformation than America has been?

"The democratic debate in Europe is less hostile and less fragmented than in the US," former Danish PM Helle Thorning-Schmidt said at the World Economic Forum in Davos, during a Global Stage livestream discussion hosted by GZERO in partnership with Microsoft. She was joined by Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media; Brad Smith, president and vice chair of Microsoft; and moderator Nicholas Thompson, CEO of The Atlantic.

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