{{ subpage.title }}

Roe v. Wade Overturned: Abortion Restricted in Half of US States | GZERO World

Roe v. Wade overturned: Abortion restricted in half of US states

Now that the US Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, roughly half the states have legislation on the books restricting abortion.

And 13 of them had "trigger laws" to ban abortion once the 1973 ruling was struck down. Residents of those states seeking abortions must now travel across state lines to get an abortion — and Missouri wants to sue those who do.

What's more, it'll be a long drive: an average of 125 miles, compared to just 25 when Roe was still the law of the land, Ian Bremmer explains on GZERO World.

Read Now Show less
Politicized SCOTUS Losing Legitimacy After Roe v. Wade Reversal | Quick Take | GZERO Media

Politicized SCOTUS losing legitimacy after Roe v. Wade reversal

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Hi, everybody. Ian Bremmer here. A Quick Take for you on the back of this landmark ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States to overturn Roe v. Wade. For 50 years now, abortion until the viability of the fetus, around 23 weeks of pregnancy, has been legal in the entirety of the United States. That ends today.

Important to look at how Americans view abortion. It's actually a very mixed picture, depending on the question that you ask. Almost all Americans, about 90%, believe that abortion should be legal in some circumstances and not in others. So, I mean, frankly broadly the compromise that's been the law of the land for the last 50 years hasn't been completely happy for anyone, but has been generally a position that most of the population could get behind. A strong majority of Democrats and Republicans do agree with that formulation, that abortion should be legal in some circumstances and illegal in other circumstances.

Read Now Show less
Victory for US Conservatives: Roe Overturned | US Politics : 60 | GZERO Media

Victory for US conservatives: Roe v. Wade overturned by SCOTUS

Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, shares his perspective on US politics:

What will be the immediate impact of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?

This week's decision is the culmination of 40 years of work by the conservative legal movement to create the alignment of justices willing to make this choice, which ironically came together during the presidency of Donald Trump, who, for most of his career, was not a conservative Republican. Abortion could become a relevant issue in the midterm elections, but surveys are showing that most voters are much more activated by the economy at the moment than abortion. That could change however as there's going to be a movement in states to either deny or preserve access to abortion, which could put the issue on the ballot in places like Pennsylvania, Michigan, Arizona and Georgia.

Read Now Show less
US Politics Are More Prone to Misinformation, Says Former Danish PM | Global Stage | GZERO Media

US politics are prone to misinformation, says former Danish PM

Why has Europe been less affected by online misinformation than America has been?

"The democratic debate in Europe is less hostile and less fragmented than in the US," former Danish PM Helle Thorning-Schmidt said at the World Economic Forum in Davos, during a Global Stage livestream discussion hosted by GZERO in partnership with Microsoft. She was joined by Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media; Brad Smith, president and vice chair of Microsoft; and moderator Nicholas Thompson, CEO of The Atlantic.

Read Now Show less
After the Buffalo Shooting: Gun Violence & US Polarization | US Politics :60 | GZERO Media

After the Buffalo shooting: gun violence and US polarization

Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, discusses Washington's response to the Buffalo shooting.

How is Washington responding to the Buffalo shooting?

Multiple mass shootings this weekend were quickly picked up by partisans on both sides who filtered them through purely political lenses. And notably those lenses ended up being about something other than gun control. Sadly, gun violence has become so common in the United States that the shootings that generate national news coverage tend to be those that fit, that can be most easily politicized. There have been at least 200 incidents involving four or more victims so far in 2022, and these shootings will not move the needle on policies that could prevent them and it's notable that so few politicians are even trying at this point. The national media response tends to see more significance in the political context of the shooting than in the shooting itself.

Read Now Show less
Supreme Court Hearings Served No Purpose & Could do Harm | US Politics: In60 | GZERO Media

SCOTUS confirmation hearings no longer serve a purpose

Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, discusses the Supreme Court hearings.

Today's question. Have the Supreme Court hearings lost their purpose?

Blanketing cable news this week are the Senate Judiciary hearings to confirm Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court. Brown Jackson surpasses anyone's standard of a qualified Supreme Court justice. She's educated at the best law schools. She's been a Supreme Court clerk, a public defender, a trial court judge, and a circuit court judge. She's at least as qualified as anybody else serving on the court today. And nobody questions that she has a top notch intellect and character to sit on the Court.

Read Now Show less
Ian Explains: America Down, China Up | GZERO World

Is the US in decline while China’s power grows?

Who said last year that the biggest source of chaos in the present-day world is the US?

Not the leader of Russia. Not of North Korea. Not even of Iran.

It was Xi Jinping, who believes America poses a major risk for China.

Read Now Show less
Want to Fix US Political Division? Narrow the Wealth Gap, Says Investor Ray Dalio | GZERO World

Want to fix US political division? Narrow the wealth gap, says investor Ray Dalio

What happened on January 6, 2021, did not at all surprise billionaire investor Ray Dalio.

History, he says, shows that both right-wing and left-wing populism begins to gain power when there's a large wealth gap.

So, what comes next?

Read Now Show less

Subscribe to GZERO Media's newsletter, Signal

Latest