What Do All The Global Protests Share In Common?

Do the protests happening globally share anything in common?

Yeah, people are angry, yeah. But what else do they have in common? Well, I mean, the fact that the world economy is getting softer means that people aren't going to be expecting as much from their governments. And there's an awful lot of sense that governing leaders are not getting it done for them. That across the board, almost every country that you see major demonstrations right now, not only are the popularity of leaders very low, but the average individual is saying, the middle class and the working class, is saying "these people do not represent me." In numbers that are historic in places like Chile and Ecuador and Bolivia and Lebanon and in other countries around the world. Also not seeing many in Asia because the economy's doing better and because the governments tend to be a little bit stronger.


Does Cristina Kirchner have more power than her new V.P. title in Argentina suggests?

Certainly does. Not necessarily to get policy done, but certainly to threaten to upset the apple cart if she doesn't like the way the new Fernandez government is going to be going. So I say she more veto power than she has legislative power.

How long will the Turkish-Russian agreement regarding Northern Syria last?

Probably not all that long in the sense that deconfliction with the Kurds is going to continue to be an issue. Keep in mind, that Turkey considers this group to be a terrorist organization. The Russians are now allied with them. That's not easy in a place that there are not all that many troops maintaining authority and where the border is poorly policed.

"I think there are certain times where you have tectonic shifts and change always happens that way."

On the latest episode of 'That Made All the Difference,' Vincent Stanley, Director of Philosophy at Patagonia, shares his thoughts on the role we all have to play in bringing our communities and the environment back to health.

For many, Paul Rusesabagina became a household name after the release of the 2004 tear-jerker film Hotel Rwanda, which was set during the 1994 Rwandan genocide.

Rusesabagina, who used his influence as a hotel manager to save the lives of more than 1,000 Rwandans, has again made headlines in recent weeks after he was reportedly duped into boarding a flight to Kigali, Rwanda's capital, where he was promptly arrested on terrorism, arson, kidnapping and murder charges. Rusesabagina's supporters say he is innocent and that the move is retaliation against the former "hero" for his public criticism of President Paul Kagame, who has ruled the country with a strong hand since ending the civil war in the mid 1990s.

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Gerald Butts, Vice Chairman & Senior Advisor of Eurasia Group, discusses reasons the rapid global response to climate change warrants optimism on UNGA In 60 Seconds.

There's a lot of doom and gloom out there about climate change. Can you give me a reason to be optimistic?

I'm going to say something you don't hear set very often when it comes to climate change. You should be an optimist. You should be a skeptical optimist, but an optimist nonetheless. Let me explain what I mean. We are scaling up climate solutions faster than even the most ardent among us thought possible a decade ago. Consider this. In 2010, about half of US electricity was generated from coal. This year less than 20% will be, and it's trending towards zero at increasing velocity.

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Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

It's UNGA week, very unusual New York to have the United Nations General Assembly meetings. You know, the city is locked down. It's almost always locked down this week, but usually you can't get anywhere because you've got all these marshals with dozens of heads of state and well over a hundred foreign ministers and their delegations jamming literally everything, Midtown and branching out across the city. This time around, the security cordon for the United Nations itself is barely a block, and no one is flying in. I mean, the weather is gorgeous, and you can walk pretty much anywhere, but nothing's really locked down aside from, of course, the fact that the restaurants and the bars and the theaters and everything else is not happening given the pandemic. And it's not just in the US, it's all around the world.

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Listen: Have you ever heard of Blue Zones? They're communities all around the globe—from Sardinia to Okinawa to Loma Linda, CA—where residents exceed the average human lifespan by years, and even decades. While they've been studied for the lessons we can learn about health, lifestyle, and environment, you don't have to live in a Blue Zone to experience increased longevity. It's happening everywhere. In fact, the number of people over 80 is expected to triple by 2050, reaching nearly half a billion. This episode of Living Beyond Borders focuses on the geopolitical and economic implications of an aging global population, how to make the most of new chapters in your life as you age, and what it all means for your money and the world around you.

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