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Donald Trump and Justin Trudeau: The opposite of a love story

Donald Trump and Justin Trudeau: The opposite of a love story

It's the stuff of real high-powered, honorable diplomacy.

While schmoozing with his chums – including Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain and President Emmanuel Macron of France – at a Buckingham Palace reception at the NATO summit in London, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was caught on video referencing President Trump's impromptu news conference earlier in the day: "You just watched his team's jaws drop to the floor," Trudeau said, oblivious that he's being recorded. President Trump, who has zero tolerance for public mockery, responded as you might expect from the president of the United States: he called Canada's premier "two-faced" and departed the summit early, abandoning a slated press conference.


But this public spat is just the latest in a string of soap-opera events between President Trump and Prime Minister Trudeau. It's worth taking a (strange) walk down memory lane to gauge the backstory.

Amid a row last year over renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between the US, Canada, and Mexico, President Trump tried using tariff threats as leverage to get Trudeau to make concessions on his country's highly protected dairy industry. After Prime Minister Trudeau said that Canada wouldn't be "bullied" on trade, Trump unleashed a tweet storm from Air Force One while on his way to meet North Korea's dear leader, calling Trudeau "very weak and dishonest."

Trump also claimed to have rejected the Canadian leader's overtures for an in person meeting, but Trudeau's spokeswoman swiftly hit back, saying "no meeting was requested" in the first place. Again, embarrassing Trump on the world stage. After a year of torturous negotiations the two leaders and their Mexican counterpart agreed on the parameters of a United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement.

And how could we forget that spellbinding photo against a romantic French backdrop this summer of a smitten Melania Trump air-kissing Justin Trudeau. Even RT, the Kremlin-steered media outlet, weighed in on twitter: "Everyone should find someone who looks at them the way Melania looks at Justin #Trudeau."

Prime Minister Trudeau today sought to play down yesterday's embarrassing incident, saying that he has "a very good relationship" with his American counterpart. Meanwhile, President Trump is already on a plane back to Washington DC. One thing's for sure: there's no love lost between these two leaders.

Carbon has a bad rep, but did you know it's a building block of life? As atoms evolved, carbon trapped in CO2 was freed, giving way to the creation of complex molecules that use photosynthesis to convert carbon to food. Soon after, plants, herbivores, and carnivores began populating the earth and the cycle of life began.

Learn more about how carbon created life on Earth in the second episode of Eni's Story of CO2 series.

On September 23, GZERO Media — in partnership with Microsoft and Eurasia Group — gathered global experts to discuss global recovery from the coronavirus pandemic in a livestream panel. Our panel for the discussion Crisis Response & Recovery: Reimagining while Rebuilding, included:

  • Brad Smith, President, Microsoft
  • Ian Bremmer, President and Founder, Eurasia Group & GZERO Media
  • Jeh Johnson, Partner, Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, LLP and former Secretary of Homeland Security.
  • John Frank, Vice President, UN Affairs at Microsoft
  • Susan Glasser, staff writer and Washington columnist, The New Yorker (moderator)

Special appearances by UN Secretary-General António Guterres, European Central Bank chief Christine Lagarde, and comedian/host Trevor Noah.

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Jon Lieber, who leads Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, offers insights on the Supreme Court vacancy:

Will Senate Republicans, who stopped a Supreme Court nomination in 2016, because it was too close to an election, pay a political price for the change in tactics this time around?

Not only do I think they won't pay a political price, I think in many cases, they're going to benefit. Changing the balance of power on the Supreme Court has been a career-long quest for many conservatives and many Republicans. And that's why you've seen so many of them fall in line behind the President's nomination before we even know who it is.

At this point, do Senate Democrats have any hope of stopping President Trump from filling the ninth seat on the Supreme Court?

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The coronavirus pandemic threatened to bring Europe's economy to its knees. Then something remarkable happened: 27 member states came together. Joining GZERO World with Ian Bremmer is the woman at the heart of that response, European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde. She'll explain how European nations were able to overcome political divisions and act quickly to prevent an all-out economic catastrophe on the continent.

Listen: The coronavirus pandemic threatened to bring Europe's economy to its knees. Then something remarkable happened: 27 member states came together. On the latest episode of the GZERO World with Ian Bremmer podcast is the woman at the heart of that response, European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde. She'll explain how European nations were able to overcome political divisions and act quickly to prevent an all-out economic catastrophe on the continent.

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Panel: How will the world recover from COVID-19?

UNGA Livestream