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US Afghanistan withdrawal: a “digital Dunkirk”
US Afghanistan Withdrawal: a “Digital Dunkirk” | GZERO World

US Afghanistan withdrawal: a “digital Dunkirk”

Could the US have done a better job at getting out of Afghanistan?

Certainly, says former US marine and CIA officer Elliot Ackerman, who recalls how calls for an evacuation plan fell on deaf ears in the Pentagon and the White House. Expediting the Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) program for Afghan allies could have been handled better as well.

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Talks with Taliban won’t legitimize them (US already did that)
Talks With Taliban Won’t Legitimize Them (US Already Did That) | Pakistan's Hina Khar | GZERO World

Talks with Taliban won’t legitimize them (US already did that)

Want the Taliban to form a more inclusive Afghan government? Talk to them. Otherwise, don't complain about millions of starving Afghans.

That's the advice of Hina Khar, Pakistan's former foreign minister, to Western nations who say they don't want to "enable" the regime.

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Can the Taliban's non-inclusive government lead a diverse country?
Can the Taliban’s Non-Inclusive Government Lead a Diverse Country? | World In :60 | GZERO Media

Can the Taliban's non-inclusive government lead a diverse country?

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week with a look at the Taliban's interim government, Chinese President Xi's efforts to redistribute wealth, and changes Bitcoin will bring to El Salvador.

A week after the US withdrawal, how is Afghanistan in the transition to Taliban rule?

Well, for now we have the transition government. They said it was going to be inclusive. It's all Pashtuns and it's all men. So it is inclusive of Pashtun men that like the Taliban. But of course, that's not the final government. And the real question is, are they going to have ethnic diversity across the country? And does that in any way forestall the likelihood of a civil war? Does it allow them to govern an incredibly diverse and difficult-to-govern country? And of course, I think we should be quite skeptical about that, but at least for now, the likelihood that the Americans or most advanced industrial economies would open diplomatic relations with them and engage with them in a constructive way still seems very, very limited.

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Afghanistan, 2021: Afghan & US military perspectives as the last soldier leaves
TITLE PLACEHOLDER | GZERO World

Afghanistan, 2021: Afghan & US military perspectives as the last soldier leaves

Two decades of war in Afghanistan came to a tragic close on August 31 as President Joe Biden announced from the White House that the last US troops had left the country. "I was not going to extend this forever war," Biden said, "and I was not extending a forever exit." On GZERO World, we hear from three people whose lives have been forever changed by the conflict. First, a women's education activist hiding from the Taliban inside Afghanistan, moving every night for her own safety. Then, the former Afghan Central Bank governor, now in exile who barely made it out (and lost a shoe in the process). And finally, a former US Army Captain and CIA intelligence officer whose life was saved by his Afghan interpreter and who is now in a desperate race to help Afghans and their families get out of the country.

Taliban, Afghan people face economic collapse, says former central bank chief
Taliban, Afghan People Face Economic Collapse, Says Former Central Bank Chief | GZERO World

Taliban, Afghan people face economic collapse, says former central bank chief

With Afghanistan's US-held assets and most foreign aid frozen, the currency in freefall, bank cash withdrawals limited and food prices surging, former Afghan central bank chief Ajmal Ahmady says the Taliban could soon run out of money to run the country. When that happens, they'll have to cut services, so "the Afghan people are undeniably going to be hurt."

Watch his interview with Ian Bremmer on a new episode of GZERO World, airing on US public television starting Friday, September 3. Check local listings.

Everything you need to know about the Afghanistan withdrawal

Everything you need to know about the Afghanistan withdrawal

On August 30, right before the clock hit midnight in Kabul, a C-17 cargo plane carrying the last US service member in Afghanistan got off the ground, thus ending America's longest-ever war.

The last American soldier, Maj. Gen. Chris Donahue, boards a C-17 plane in Kabul. The last American soldier, Maj. Gen. Chris Donahue, boards a C-17 plane in Kabul. (US Central Command)

"The past 17 days have seen our troops execute the largest airlift in US history, evacuating over 120,000 US citizens, citizens of our allies, and Afghan allies of the United States [...] Now, our 20-year military presence in Afghanistan has ended."

Here's everything you need to know (but were afraid to ask) about how we got here, what it means both at home and abroad, and what to watch for in the coming weeks and months.

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Afghan girls should stay in school despite Taliban rule, activist says
Afghan Girls Should Stay in School Despite Taliban Rule — Activist | GZERO Media

Afghan girls should stay in school despite Taliban rule, activist says

If you're an Afghan girl, teacher and activist Pashtana Durrani says it's time to tell the Taliban you'll keep going to school because it's your right — and good for Afghanistan after 20 years of relying on the US. "We have to do something on our own, and for that it's very important to start by educating ourselves [...] by becoming a scientist, a doctor, a teacher, to have that human capacity to serve the country for the greater good." Just because a few men in Kabul have changed, she adds, that doesn't justify "that we have to change our way of life for them." Watch her interview with GZERO World's Ian Bremmer.

Watch the full interview: Afghan activist: Taliban won't make us change our way of life

Afghan activist: Taliban don’t have a plan to run Afghanistan
Afghan Activist: Taliban Don’t Have a Plan To Run Afghanistan | GZERO Media

Afghan activist: Taliban don’t have a plan to run Afghanistan

The Taliban have taken over Afghanistan militarily, but they have yet to show they can also govern — perhaps because they don't have a plan. "Military men can never do public policy. We all know this," says Pashtana Durrani, an Afghan teacher and women's rights activist who's in hiding and moving around the country because she wants to stay to resist Taliban rule. Watch her full interview with GZERO World's Ian Bremmer.

Watch the full interview: Afghan activist: Taliban won't make us change our way of life

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