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S2 Episode 7: Why biodiversity loss matters to governments and investors


Listen: Are global leaders finally taking needed action on environmental issues? Coming out of the COP26 meeting in Glasgow, we've seen governments agree to a certain set of policies to fight climate change. But that isn't the only urgent environmental issue we face. The twin problem of climate change AND biodiversity loss are a serious threat to not just governments, but also investors.

The latest episode of Living Beyond Borders, a special podcast series from GZERO brought to you by Citi Private Bank, looks at how important biodiversity is to the global economy, and what leaders need to do to prevent further loss. Moderated by Caitlin Dean, Head of the Geostrategy Practice at Eurasia Group, this episode features Anita McBain, Managing Director at Citi Research, heading EMEA ESG Research; Harlin Singh, Global Head of Sustainable Investing at Citi Global Wealth; and Mikaela McQuade, Director of Energy, Climate and Resources at Eurasia Group.

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“Fine words” on climate aren’t enough: UN Environment Chief Inger Andersen

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer speaks with Inger Andersen, Executive Director of the UN Environment Program. Will the UN Climate Conference (COP26) produce lasting change or just more hot air? The world's top 20 economies, Andersen says, are responsible for over three-quarters of global carbon emissions, so if they "make the requisite shifts, frankly we are out of the climate crisis."

Watch this episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer: Surviving a warming planet

Why biodiversity loss from climate change matters

Raging fires, droughts, and superstorms like Sandy and Katrina are very visible impacts of climate change, but the damage to animals and plants flies under the radar. For UN environment chief Inger Andersen, that's because humans often take biodiversity for granted despite having messed up more than three-quarters of the planet's land and sea — and the consequences will be severe when nature stops behaving. "We have fragmented […] and converted so much land that nature is being squeezed into little corners." Watch her interview with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Watch this episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer: Surviving a warming planet

Surviving a warming planet

Fires, floods, and droughts. Climate change is already happening but so far humans have been slow to react. Will the UN Climate Conference (COP26) produce lasting change or just more hot air? On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer speaks with Inger Andersen, Executive Director of the UN Environment Program. Plus, a look at what's driving the United Kingdom's fuel shortage.

Genetic study shows red panda is two separate species

February 27, 2020 11:10 PM

WASHINGTON (REUTERS) - Red pandas, the bushy-tailed and russet-furred bamboo munchers that dwell in Asian high forests, are not a single species but rather two distinct ones, according to the most comprehensive genetic study to date on these endangered mammals.

Bengal tigers may not survive climate change

May 11, 2019 5:00 AM

Climate change and rising sea levels eventually may wipe out one of the world's last and largest tiger strongholds, scientists have warned in a new study.

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