scroll to top arrow or icon

{{ subpage.title }}

Americans released in a swap deal between the U.S. and Iran arrive in Doha.

Reuters

US-Iran prisoner swap comes through

The US and Iran on Monday traded prisoners in a high stakes swap that’s causing problems for President Biden at home.

After months of negotiations, the two foes traded 10 prisoners: five US citizens locked up in Iran, and five Iranians detained in the US, some of whom were charged but hadn’t been convicted.

Read moreShow less
Iranian activists want the West to stop legitimizing Iran's regime
Iranian Activist to the West: No Nuclear Deal, Just Isolate Regime and Let Us Oust It | GZERO World

Iranian activists want the West to stop legitimizing Iran's regime

French President Emmanuel Macron recently got flak for shaking the hand of Iran's President Ebrahim Raisi. In part to smooth things over, Macron agreed to meet with dissidents — including journalist and activist Masih Alinejad.

Her message to him and the West in general? Recall your ambassadors from Iran and don't return to the 2015 nuclear deal.

"The only thing can make [the regime] survive [is] the US government and its allies to get back to the deal," Alinejad tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Read moreShow less
Iran's people vs. hardline rulers
Ian Explains: Iranian People vs. Their Rulers | GZERO World

Iran's people vs. hardline rulers

Woman. Life. Freedom.

Those three words have filled the streets of Iran since the women-led protests agains the regime erupted last September.

The rallying cry began after a young woman, Mahsa Amini, died after being beaten by cops for not wearing her headscarf properly.

Since then, more than 14,000 people have been arrested, at least 326 killed, and one executed. It's the biggest uprising Iran has seen since the so-called "Green Movement" in 2009, Ian Bremmer explains on GZERO World.

Read moreShow less
How the Iranian regime’s brutality is backfiring
Protests Bringing Unprecedented Unity Among Iranians, Says Activist | GZERO World

How the Iranian regime’s brutality is backfiring

Iran's crackdown on the ongoing women-led protests against the regime has been fierce — but uneven. Protestors in the Kurdish region, for instance, have faced brutal, and frequently fatal backlash from the government.

Yet the people have come out everywhere.

Why? "The more that they kill, the more people get angry to take back to the streets," Iranian activist and journalist Masih Alinejad tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Read moreShow less
Iran v. the Islamic Republic: Fighting Iran’s gender apartheid regime
Iran V. The Islamic Republic: Fighting Iran’s Gender Apartheid Regime | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Iran v. the Islamic Republic: Fighting Iran’s gender apartheid regime

Woman, life, freedom. Those three words have filled the streets of Iran since the ongoing women-led protests against the regime, the biggest since 2009, began last September.

How did Iranian women get here? How has the theocracy responded so far? And what might come next?

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer speaks to Iranian journalist and activist Masih Alinejad, a sworn enemy of the Supreme Leader; it's widely believed that Iranian spies have tried to kidnap and assassinate her here in New York.

Read moreShow less
Bryan Olin Dozier via Reuters Connect

Podcast: After Mahsa Amini: Iran’s fight for freedom, with Masih Alinejad

Transcript

Listen: Iran is being rocked by its most significant protests since the Green Movement of 2009. Since September, hundreds of thousands of young and mostly female demonstrators have filled the streets of nearly every major city from Tehran to Tabriz, many discarding their headscarves at great personal risk to protest draconian societal rules and restrictions. The backlash from security forces has been brutal, though (except in the Kurdish region) the government has yet to send in the Revolutionary Guard.

Iranian-American journalist and activist Masih Alinejad joins Ian Bremmer on the GZERO World podcast to discuss. Where will these protests lead, and what are the geopolitical implications for the region, and for the West? Alinejad shares her views on the unprecedented unity among the Iranian protesters, her personal experience being targeted by the Iranian government even after moving to the United States, and why the Iranian men's World Cup team does not deserve sympathy.

Why Iranians celebrated their soccer team’s World Cup elimination
Why Iranians Celebrated Their Soccer Team’s World Cup Elimination | GZERO World

Why Iranians celebrated their soccer team’s World Cup elimination

Withhold your sympathy for the Iranian national soccer team, says Iranian activist and journalist Masih Alinejad. They represented the Islamic regime, she tells Ian Bremmer in an upcoming GZERO World interview, not the people.

Alinejad goes on to argue that the national team’s World Cup elimination (at the hands of the United States, no less) means that “the Islamic Republic is kicked out of the World Cup. It doesn’t have a global platform anymore to normalize its murderous regime.”

In a lively conversation, Bremmer presses Alinejad on why she believes that the Iranian soccer players did “too little, too late” to protest their government when they had the world’s attention.

Read moreShow less

From left to right, the presidents of Russia (Vladimir Putin), Iranian (Ebrahim Raisi), and Turkey (Recep Tayyip Erdogan) hold talks in Tehran.

utnik/Sergei Savostyanov/Pool via REUTERS

What We're Watching: Tehran trilateral, EU food jitters, Sri Lankan presidential vote

Putin, Raisi & Erdogan in Tehran: friends with differences

Leaving the former Soviet region for the first time since he ordered the invasion of Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin met in Tehran on Tuesday with his Iranian and Turkish counterparts. The conflict in Syria, where Russia and Iran are on the opposite side of Turkey, was the main item on the agenda, but little of substance was announced beyond a pledge to rid the country of terrorist groups and to meet again later this year. Importantly, Turkey’s recent threat to invade northern Syria to destroy Kurdish militant groups based there still hangs in the air — a point underscored by Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s call for Russia and Iran to be more “supportive” of Turkey’s security concerns. Still, both Moscow and Tehran have warned him against an invasion. Putin and Erdogan also failed to close the remaining gaps on a UN-backed plan to restart Ukraine’s seaborne grain exports. Lastly, while Putin and the Iranians traded shots at NATO and the West, there was no public mention of the current, fast-fading efforts to revive the long-stalled 2015 Iran nuclear deal.

Read moreShow less

Subscribe to our free newsletter, GZERO Daily

Latest