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Ian Explains: Why is global debt so high?
Ian Explains: Why is global debt so high? | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Ian Explains: Why is global debt so high?

As of 2023, global debt as ballooned to an eye-watering $300 trillion. That’s an average of $37,500 for every person on the planet.

Why is global debt so high? Decades of low interest rates and cheap good made money easy to borrow. Then, along came a pandemic which stalled growth and a war in Ukraine that drove food and energy prices through the roof.

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Debt limits of rich countries hurt poor countries' growth, says World Bank's Malpass
Debt limits of rich countries hurt poor countries' growth, says World Bank's Malpass | GZERO World

Debt limits of rich countries hurt poor countries' growth, says World Bank's Malpass

Does the global financial system need a major overhaul?

In his final interview on GZERO World as president of the World Bank Group, David Malpass discusses a serious problem with host Ian Bremmer: the consolidation of economic and political power in the hands of the wealthiest countries. The world is facing a massive debt crisis––60% of low-income countries are now in debt distress or dangerously close to it. The poorest countries are paying an average of 16% of revenue on servicing loans.

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Want to help poor countries now? Open your markets to their farmers, World Bank chief tells wealthy nations
Want to help poor countries now? Open your markets to their farmers | Global Stage | GZERO Media

Want to help poor countries now? Open your markets to their farmers, World Bank chief tells wealthy nations

Many developing countries now face high inflation, especially rising food prices.

What can they do to alleviate some of that pain? Wealthy nations should step in by opening their markets to farmers from poor nations, World Bank President David Malpass says during a Global Stage livestream conversation hosted by GZERO Media in partnership with Microsoft.

"This is a moment to make friends, to help people that ... don't have as much."

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Making sense of our new global economy
Ian Explains: Making Sense of Our New Global Economy | GZERO World

Making sense of our new global economy

If billionaires shooting off into space because their net worth has jumped 60 percent sounds cringeworthy to you, you're not alone. Indeed, the pandemic hasn't been kind to the 120 million people into extreme poverty. Nor to the global economy as a whole, which stands to lose $2.3 trillion by 2025 due to vaccine inequality.

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Scientist Jennifer Doudna on making CRISPR technology viable — and affordable — for everyone
Scientist Jennifer Doudna on Making CRISPR Tech Viable — and Affordable — for Everyone | GZERO World

Scientist Jennifer Doudna on making CRISPR technology viable — and affordable — for everyone

While global cooperation on public health issues like access to COVID vaccines continues to sputter, a group of scientists from around the world are quietly working on making CRISPR gene-editing technology within reach for rich and poor nations alike. "We're going to want to work as quickly as possible to scale it to a point where that also helps bring down the cost," says Jennifer Doudna, who won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her work on CRISPR. Watch her interview with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Watch the episode: CRISPR gene editing and the human race

Rethinking the post-pandemic workplace
Ian Bremmer Explains: Rethinking the Post-Pandemic Workplace | GZERO World

Rethinking the post-pandemic workplace

While the pandemic continues to ravage much of the world, the rich world is opening back for business and companies are preparing to bring their employees back to the office. But quite a few of those workers don't seem thrilled about a return to pre-COVID workplace norms. A recent survey of 30,000 Americans found that three in ten never want to return to the office again. Another poll found that one in three US workers wouldn't want to work for an employer who requires them to be on site full time. But Wall Street's impatience is starting to show. Take Morgan Stanley CEO James Gorman, who effectively told his New York City employees that they should expect to be back in their cubicles by September, or else. If employers are going to require that their workers return to the office, what should those workers expect in return?

Watch the episode: Adam Grant reimagines work after COVID

“Essential workers” and the inequality of work
“Essential Workers” and the Inequality of Work | GZERO World

“Essential workers” and the inequality of work

Organizational psychologist Adam Grant discusses the "essential workers" who kept the world going throughout the pandemic and didn't get to work from home. According to Grant, the US should be rethinking its policy on essential work. "Where was hazard pay for all the teachers? For all the medical professionals? For all the warehouse workers who put their lives at risk to keep the world running, and to try to keep the economy alive as well?" asked Grant, in an interview with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Watch the episode: Adam Grant reimagines work after COVID

Gabriella Turrisi

2.6 billion people: “WTF is WFH?”

As the world's wealthier and more fully vaccinated countries begin to emerge from the pandemic, there's a lot of talk about "the office".

When do we go back to it? Do we go back to it? What is an "office" now anyway?

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