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Podcast: How we overcome infectious disease with a public health renaissance

Listen: Former CDC chief Tom Frieden says he's stunned by how infectious COVID is compared to other diseases. The pandemic isn't over yet, he tells Ian Bremmer on the GZERO World podcast, thanks to long COVID plus the fact that we can't predict how the virus will play out in the future. Frieden's advice for everyone is to get vaxxed and boosted, to "keep yourself out of the hospital and, quite frankly, out of the morgue," since new variants could emerge, making the virus more deadly.

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Should We Worry About Monkeypox? | Former CDC Director Tom Frieden | GZERO World

Should we worry about monkeypox?

Now that many parts of the world have moved on from COVID, should we be worried about monkeypox?

Certainly, but we need to know more about the disease, former CDC chief Tom Frieden tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

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A Children’s Book on Vaccination | GZERO Media

A children’s book on vaccination

In recent weeks, both Pfizer and Moderna have announced early phases of vaccine trials in children, and Johnson & Johnson also plans to start soon. If you know a kid who wants to learn about vaccines, how they work, why we need them, this story is just what the doctor ordered.

Watch the episode: Vaccine nationalism could prolong the pandemic

Ian Explains: How Development of the COVID-19 Vaccine Shattered Records | GZERO Media

How development of the COVID-19 vaccine shattered records

They said it couldn't be done: a vaccine developed in record time. In 1967, Merck had a license for a mumps vaccine, less than five years for work that normally takes decades. But that record is now being shattered as the COVID-19 vaccine reaches the market in less than a year. It's an unprecedented scientific development in a whirlwind year of crisis.

Watch the GZERO World episode: A Shot in the Arm: Moderna's Co-Founder on the COVID-19 Vaccine

Worried Sick | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer Full Episode

Worried Sick

The "Spanish flu" virus of 1918 killed an estimated 50 million people, more than all the deaths in World War I combined. While global public health efforts have greatly improved mortality rates in more modern outbreaks, experts say the next pandemic is a matter of "when," not "if." In this episode, Ian Bremmer takes a look how diseases spread and become global. His guest, Dr. Anthony Fauci, is a leading epidemiologist and director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the NIH.

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