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How the Supreme Court immunity ruling changes presidential power
Supreme Court's immunity protects Trump from Jan. 6 prosecution | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

How the Supreme Court immunity ruling changes presidential power

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

What does the Supreme Court's immunity decision mean for Trump and the future of presidential power?

Well, for Trump, the first thing it means is that you're not going to be hearing about on the case of his involvement in January 6th. All of that gets punted until after the election earliest, assuming Biden wins and more likely these days, Trump. The case is kind of a dead letter. More broadly for presidential power. We're talking about immunity for all official acts that are engaged in during the course of a person's presidency. Now, in dissent, Justice Sotomayor, who's pretty far left on the court, has said that this doesn't prevent a president from engaging in treasonous acts and makes the president a king. Most jurists don't accept that, but it certainly does lead to huge questions about what is and what is not an official act. And of course, presidents would be inclined to argue that very broadly to be able to avoid the potential at any cases against them. So this is a pretty significant, not necessary momentous, but certainly very significant decision by the court.

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France's snap election: Understanding why Macron took the risk
France's snap election: Understanding why Macron took the risk | Mark Carney | GZERO World

France's snap election: Understanding why Macron took the risk

With Emmanuel Macron’s approval ratings at a historic low, and far-right parties gaining popularity, could France’s upcoming election be its own “Brexit” moment? Mark Carney, former governor of the Banks of England and Canada and current UN Special Envoy on Climate Action & Finance, joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to discuss snap elections in the UK and France, the complexities of Brexit, and its ongoing impact on domestic politics in Europe.

“There are a wide range of aspects of the UK-European relationship which don't work,” Carney says, “There's massive red tape, for example, in agricultural products, massive red tape and delays at the border, the inner workings of a very interconnected financial system.”

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How political unrest across the West will impact the world: A conversation with UN's Mark Carney


Listen: On this episode of the GZERO World Podcast, major Western democracies like France, the UK, Canada, and the US are on the verge of sweeping political change, but how will upcoming elections impact our collective ability to deal with the world’s biggest challenges like climate, AI, and cyber defense? Mark Carney, former Governor of the Banks of England and Canada and current UN Special Envoy on Climate Action & Finance, joins Ian Bremmer to take a hard look at three of America’s closest allies: France, Britain, and Canada.

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Hunter Biden's convictions won't derail his father's re-election bid
Hunter Biden's convictions won't derail his father's re-election bid | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

Hunter Biden's convictions won't derail his father's re-election bid

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60, live from the Toronto US-Canada Summit.

What are the implications of Hunter Biden's convictions for his father's presidential campaign?

You know, it's a little bit of tit for tat. You're going to see a lot of Republicans saying, “See the Biden crime family! Look at this guy. I mean, he's a convict.” It's ugly. It's embarrassing for the Biden family, of course. But at the same time, it's not very significant charges and it certainly doesn't link directly to President Biden. Five months away, are people going to be talking about this or Trump's 34 convictions, the weakest of the cases that he's actually facing? I suspect neither of them are going to matter very much, even though, on balance, Trump's is the one that should matter more.

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Denmark's Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen gives her Constitution Day in Copenhagen, Denmark, on June 5, 2024.

Ritzau Scanpix/Mads Claus Rasmussen via REUTERS

Danish PM attacked in the street

Political violence is surging – even where you’d least expect it.

Danish PM Mette Frederiksen was attacked on a Copenhagen street on Friday, just two days before her country votes in EU Parliament elections. Her Social Democrats are the largest party in Denmark’s government, but they’ve been losing support in recent months.

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