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Insurance companies are feeling the heat of climate crisis
Insurance companies are feeling the heat of climate crisis | GZERO Media

Insurance companies are feeling the heat of climate crisis

To understand how bad the problem of climate change has become, it helps to follow the money.

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer breaks down the impact of climate change on property insurance premiums, which effectively quantifies the growing risk of catastrophic weather events. Last year alone, extreme weather damage cost the world a staggering $165 billion. Formerly once-in-a-generation weather events like the California wildfires of 2017 or Hurricane Harvey in 2018 are becoming more and more common, leading to devastating financial consequences for homeowners and hikes in insurance premiums.

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Climate change: are we overreacting?
Climate change: are we overreacting? | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Climate change: are we overreacting?

Climate experts agree that climate change is real and human-caused. But how far should the world go to combat it? Will the worst-case scenarios forecast by climate scientists end up a reality?

On GZERO World with Ian Bremmer, author Bjorn Lomborg says the answer is no. Climate change is indeed a problem, he says, but “it’s not the end of the world.”

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Ian Explains: Can we save the planet without hurting the economy?
Ian Explains: Can we save the planet without hurting the economy? | GZERO Media

Ian Explains: Can we save the planet without hurting the economy?

“How much are we willing to sacrifice to stop climate change?”

That’s how the conversation is usually framed, that fighting climate change requires some sort of trade-off: save the planet vs. maintain living standards, reduce carbon emissions vs. increase profits, lower global temperatures vs. lift more people out of poverty.

On Ian Explains, Ian Bremmer argues that this framing is actually a false choice. In the last decade, the underlying technology and economics of decarbonization have improved so much, we no longer need to choose between investing in climate mitigation and economic growth. In fact, clean energy technology like solar panels, wind turbines, and advanced battery storage have become, in many ways, more affordable than fossil fuels.

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Is life better than ever for the human race?
Is life better than ever? Measuring human progress today | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Is life better than ever for the human race?

Was the Beatles' Paul McCartney right - is it getting better all the time? On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer and Harvard psychologist Stephen Pinker talk about human progress and how we define it. Sure, it's great that we're not currently being chased by saber-toothed tigers. Life is better than death. Health is preferable to sickness. Freedom? We'll take it over tyranny any day of the week. In short, we know life is better today than it was for most of our ancestors, but how do we measure that progress? And at what point does the technology that has improved our lives come back to bite us? We're looking at you, AI.
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Podcast: UN Secretary-General António Guterres explains why peace in Ukraine is his top priority

Transcript

Listen: The challenges facing the world today, from conflict in Ukraine to climate catastrophes across the globe, cannot be solved by one country alone. The need for multilateral solutions between nations, even between warring nations, has never been greater. And yet, as diplomats, ministers, and heads of state converge on the United Nations in New York this week for the 78th annual UN General Assembly, the UN Secretary-General fears that we are entering a time of increased global fragmentation.

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Ian Explains: The UN General Assembly meets amidst converging crises
Ian Explains: The UN General Assembly Meets Amidst Converging Crises | GZERO World

Ian Explains: The UN General Assembly meets amidst converging crises

There’s no shortage of global crises facing the United Nations as heads of state and top diplomats converge on New York City next week for the annual UN General Assembly.

But this year, things seem particularly dire. Whether it’s the costly war in Ukraine, lurching towards its third year with no end in sight, or the ongoing climate crisis that UN Secretary-General António Guterres says is “boiling” the planet, it’s clear that the thorniest global issues cannot be solved by one nation alone. Oh, and don’t forget our brave new world of artificial intelligence.

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Fmr. U.S. President Donald Trump delivers remarks on the day of his court appearance in New York after being indicted by a Manhattan grand jury. Photo taken in Palm Beach, Florida, U.S., April 4, 2023.

REUTERS/Marco Bello

Hard Numbers: Trump leads early, NPR & PBS quit Twitter, stopgap for Darien, global warming juices baseballs

49.3: FiveThirtyEight launched its national polling averages for the 2024 Republican presidential race this week, and Donald Trump leads the pack with 49.3% support. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis trails well behind with 26.2%, while fmr. VP Mike Pence and fmr. UN ambassador Nikki Haley are at 5.8% and 4.3%, respectively. Research finds that national polls done a year ahead of the election can reasonably predict the nominee.

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COP27: Not good enough
- YouTube

COP27: Not good enough

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take: Hi everybody. Ian Bremmer here on a Quick Take to get you kicked off for your week.

I thought I would talk about the Climate Summit, which has just concluded in Sharm El Sheik, the COP27 was not one of the better moments for global climate response. If there was a big win, and I wouldn't call it a big win, but at least it's progress, it's on the establishment of a loss and damage fund and the idea is to use funds from industrialized countries that pay for climate related losses that are already being experienced in the billions and billions of dollars in poorer countries. The developing countries have been demanding the developed world indeed put such a fund together. The problem is of course, that in addition to the reluctance to get it done, just saying that you have such a fund does not have a mechanism for distributing money, a mechanism for raising money, and certainly there is no cash, there's no financing yet. Maybe over time you'll see the private sector make donations into this fund, maybe you'll see some government commitments but for now at least, it's an announcement of intentionality without any there there. That's the big news, right? That's the actual major headline that came out.

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