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Stop AI disinformation with laws & lawyers: Ian Bremmer & Maria Ressa
How do you keep AI safe? Start with lawyers | Global Stage | GZERO Media

Stop AI disinformation with laws & lawyers: Ian Bremmer & Maria Ressa

How do you keep guardrails on AI? “In the United States, historically, we don't respond with censorship. We respond with lawyers,” said Ian Bremmer, President and Founder of the Eurasia Group & GZERO Media, speaking in a GZERO Global Stage discussion live from the 2023 Paris Peace Forum.

Setting up basic legal structures around artificial intelligence is the first step toward building an infrastructure of accountability that can keep the technology from doing at least as much harm as good.

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AI, election integrity, and authoritarianism: Insights from Maria Ressa
AI challenges in upholding democracy - insights from Maria Ressa | Global Stage | GZERO Media

AI, election integrity, and authoritarianism: Insights from Maria Ressa

There’s a big, big problem with using AI to defend democracy, says Rappler CEO Maria Ressa: “You need to feed it.”

“AI as a defense tool will always be behind the eight-ball because it is reactive," she said, requiring terabytes of data at a time to pick out the patterns that betray malicious actors. By the time they are detected, they can flood social media with lies that amplify ordinary citizens’ fear when they don’t know what to believe.

Ressa spoke in a GZERO Global Stage livestream discussion with Ian Bremmer, President and Founder, Eurasia Group & GZERO Media, Eléonore Caroit, Vice-President of the French Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee, and Microsoft Vice Chair and President Brad Smith, moderated by Julien Pain, journalist and host of Franceinfo, live from the 2023 Paris Peace Forum.

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How are emerging technologies helping to shape democracy?
Embracing technology to protect democracy | GZERO Media

How are emerging technologies helping to shape democracy?

How do you know that what you are seeing, hearing, and reading is real?

It’s not an abstract question: Artificial intelligence technology allows anyone with an internet connection and a half-decent laptop to fabricate entirely fictitious video, audio, and text and spread it around the world in the blink of an eye.

The media may be ephemeral, but the threat to governments, journalists, corporations, and you yourself is here to stay. That’s what Julien Pain, journalist and host of Franceinfo, tried to get at during the GZERO Global Stage discussion he moderated live from the 2023 Paris Peace Forum.

In response to a poll that showed 77% of the GZERO audience felt democracies are weakening, Eléonore Caroit, vice president of the French Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee, pointed out that the more alarming part is many people around the globe are sufficiently frightened to trade away democratic liberties for the purported stability of unfree governments — a trend authoritarian regimes exploit using AI.

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GZERO celebrates International Women's Day
TITLE PLACEHOLDLER - INTL WOMEN'S DAY 2023 VIDEO | GZERO Media

GZERO celebrates International Women's Day

On International Women's Day, we’re proud to showcase just a few of the exceptional women we’ve interviewed on “GZERO World with Ian Bremmer,” our weekly program on US public television. The accomplishments of these remarkable women have made them role models globally. Click to watch our interviews with:

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Philippines court convicts top journalist — what comes next?

Over a year ago, we reported on Maria Ressa's conviction for cyber-libel in the Philippines. While her appeal works its way through the country's byzantine justice system, today she won the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize. Below is our original piece published on June 15, 2020.

Ever since the rough-spoken populist Rodrigo Duterte was elected president of the Philippines in 2016, journalists have warned that his open disdain for the media would put press freedom in the country at risk.

On Monday, those fears were underscored when the authorities found Maria Ressa, an internationally-renowned journalist and fierce critic of Duterte's, guilty of libel under the country's cybercrimes law.

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Maria Ressa, the CEO of online news platform Rappler, speaks to the media after posting bail at a Manila Regional Trial Court in Manila City.

REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez

Maria Ressa: Fearless and fair

The last time I saw my former boss Maria Ressa, about three years ago in New York, she wasn't worried about being arrested upon her return to the Philippines. Her friends and family had told her to consider staying in America, as she's a dual citizen after growing up in New Jersey. But she thought it was her duty to go back to Manila and continue doing her job as CEO of independent news site Rappler.

She wasn't arrested that time for her role in Rappler updating an old article deemed by a judge to be retroactively libelous. But she was detained in February 2019 over the same charge, and again a month later for allegedly violating a ban on foreign ownership of the media. Maria got out on bail both times, but that wasn't the end of her legal troubles.

In June 2020, she was convicted of cyber-libel, and now faces up to 100 years in prison under a very loose and retroactive interpretation of the law that's been panned as an attack on press freedom.

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Maria Ressa on Filipino reaction to Duterte government's militarized COVID response
Maria Ressa on Duterte’s Order to “Shoot Them Dead” | Militarization of COVID Response | GZERO Media

Maria Ressa on Filipino reaction to Duterte government's militarized COVID response

Embattled journalist Maria Ressa talks with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World about how the COVID-19 pandemic has bolstered President Rodrigo Duterte's authoritarian approach to governing the Philippines, and how the lockdown there has sparked a social movement among citizens. Duterte's order to kill those breaking quarantine rules, she says, "fueled Filipinos who are stuck at home to go out online, and for the first time, the day after President Duterte said that, #oustDutertenow trended number one overnight and globally as well."

“I am a cautionary tale for journalists": Maria Ressa on her legal battle
“I am a cautionary tale for journalists” | Maria Ressa on Her Legal Battle | GZERO Media

“I am a cautionary tale for journalists": Maria Ressa on her legal battle

As Filipina journalist Maria Ressa, CEO of the online news agency Rappler, faces charges that could potentially lead to 100 years in prison, she talks with Ian Bremmer about the case that has made her a global advocate for press freedom. President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines targeted her and Rappler as he manages the nation under "the 3C's: corrupt, coerce, co-opt," she says.

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