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“Politics ought to be boring”: Tom Nichols on Biden’s first 100 days

For international relations expert Tom Nichols, the best way to have a non-divisive US presidency is to elect a president who's "kind of boring." That's what Joe Biden has delivered so far, a stark contrast to the high drama of the previous administration, and deeply unsettling for the GOP. Ian Bremmer's interview with Nichols on the latest episode of GZERO World begins airing on US public television Friday, April 30. Check local listings.

What's the verdict on Biden's first 100 days?

Ever since Franklin Delano Roosevelt promised to rescue the country from the Great Depression during his first 100 days in office, that timeframe has become a customary early benchmark to assess the performance of US presidents.

When Joe Biden took office on January 20, the country was mired in a Depression-like crisis caused by the COVID pandemic and associated economic fallout. So how well has he done during his first 100 days in office? Eurasia Group analyst Clayton Allen explains where Biden has performed best and where he's missed a few shots already.

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J&J vaccine review will cause hesitancy; Blinken warns China on Taiwan

Ian Bremmer shares his perspective on global politics this week on World In 60: J&J vaccine woes, Blinken warns China, Fukushima water and a large rabbit.

How will the pause of Johnson & Johnson vaccine affect the overall pandemic fight in the United States?

Yeah. Right at it, right? Well, we heard that the FDA has suspended vaccines from J&J because of blood clots. They found six in seven million cases. It's kind of like the suspension of AstraZeneca in Europe. It's likely only going to last for a few days. It's a very small percentage of the total number of vaccines that are being jabbed right now into the arms of Americans. It's not going to really slow America's ability to get everyone vaccinated, but it is going to create more vaccine hesitancy. People at the margins will say, "Is this safe? They said it was fine. Now they're saying it's not okay." I understand why there's enormous caution on the part of the FDA, but I wish, wish, wish the communications had been a little softer around all of this. Also will be a problem in terms of export, as J&J is going to be a piece of that. And again, others around the world will say, "Well, if I don't get Moderna, if I don't get Pfizer, I'm not sure I want to take it at all." So all of this is negative news, though I would still say the United States this year is looking really, really good among major economies in dealing with pandemic.

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Biden's first press conference reaffirms his working man approach

Get insights on the latest news in US politics from Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington:

Joe Biden gave the first press conference of his presidency today, a much-anticipated event that a lot of political reporters were pretty excited about, that didn't really move the needle on any messaging aspects of the administration.

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Dr. Fauci’s cautious take on post-vaccine life

Dr. Tony Fauci has faced renewed heat lately from critics across the political spectrum, including The View's Meghan McCain, who feel the White House has not provided clear enough guidance to Americans about how to navigate the pandemic. And as millions receive their second jab of COVID-19 vaccines, demands for clear guidelines about what vaccinated Americans can or cannot do have grown louder. On GZERO World, Dr. Fauci offers more context, but stops short from providing definitive answers, about post-vaccine life. "You know, things will change gradually because we want to accumulate data....Just because you're vaccinated, restaurants are not going to open. Ball games are not going to be played necessarily. Theaters are not going to be open."

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The battles ahead against COVID-19

"This is the part of the horror film where a happy ending seems in sight, but it is obvious to those paying attention that the monster is not dead and that the worst may be yet to come." That's how New York Times columnist Ezra Klein described this moment in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. We're in a new year, there's a new president, and the record-breaking development of vaccines that work has wounded the monster, but there are deadly battles still ahead. Chief among them: the highly-contagious variants of the COVID-19 virus.

Watch the GZERO World episode: The race to vaccinate

The Biden administration’s vaccine rollout priorities

While surgeon and public health expert Dr. Atul Gawande thinks that the Biden administration has been hitting most of the marks when it comes to turning around the US vaccine rollout operation, there's one area where they need to step things up: the development of cheaper and more effective antiviral drugs for people infected with COVID-19. But when it comes to vaccine distribution itself, Dr. Gawande believes that the current administration has a firm grasp on boosting vaccine supply.

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Why President Biden's first 100 days matter

President Biden has set an ambitious agenda for his first 100 days in office. Why is there so much pressure riding on that small amount of time, which is less than 7% of an American president's four-year term? Ian Bremmer explains how the "first 100 days" idea started 88 years ago, when President Franklin Delano Roosevelt had to pull the United States out of the greatest economic crisis the modern world had ever known.

Watch the GZERO World episode: After the insurrection: will Congress find common ground?

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