Ferrera Erbognone, a small town in the northern Italian province of Pavia, is home to one of the most cutting-edge computing centers in the world: Eni's Green Data Center. All of the geophysical and seismic prospecting data Eni produces from all over the world ends up here. Now, the Green Data Center is welcoming a new supercomputing system: HPC5, an advanced version of the already powerful HPC4. Due to be completed by early 2020, HPC5 will triple the Green Data Center's computing power, from 18.6 to 52 petaflops, equivalent to 52 million billion mathematical operations per second.

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

Earlier this year, two powerful cyclones struck the northern coast of Mozambique and were followed by months of torrential rain. Mozambique faced an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. "The coast road from Pemba airport to the city center and its harbor was totally destroyed," said Franco Picciani, operations manager at Eni Rovuma Basin. The damage brought the city's economy to a standstill.

Eni answered the call, providing its equipment and expertise. "We rebuilt the coast road in less than two months," Picciani said. "We work in the area. We have a logistics base here. It's home to us. When the area needed help, we didn't stop to think about it for a minute. It goes without saying that we should look after the community we work in."

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

A Nobel Prize Battery

Although they were invented 40 years ago, lithium batteries are still the most efficient batteries we have, and you can find them in everything from smartphones to electric cars. Traditional batteries were made of lead and sulphuric acid, nickel and cadmium, and they were less reliable. In October, John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their contributions to the development of lithium batteries. Thanks to these three men, each of us can spend a little less time hunting for a plug.

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

The First Element

Hydrogen was the first element to form in the moments after the big bang, it's the most abundant element in the galaxy, and it's the first element on the periodic table. It is present as water in the atmosphere but makes up organic compounds in the biosphere. Under normal environmental conditions, hydrogen spontaneously and explosively combines with oxygen, producing invisible flames that leap upwards. It's a gas that releases energy by reacting naturally with the oxygen in the air, emitting harmless water — and that makes hydrogen an ideal resource for powering electric cars.

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

Coffee is one of the most popular drinks in the world, but that means it creates a lot of waste in the form of cups and used coffee grinds. Every year, we drink out of 600 billion single-use plastic and paper cups, most of which end up in a landfill or our environment. Could coffee also contribute to a more sustainable future? A German company is now recovering leftover coffee grounds from bars, restaurants and hotels, and it's recycling them into reusable coffee cups. In other words, they're creating cups of coffee made from coffee.

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

Electricity consumption in our homes contributes 25% of all greenhouse gas emissions. What if we could transform this huge contributing factor into a solution? That's what Eni's luminescent solar concentrators can do. These transparent, colored slabs can be inserted into home windows to capture solar energy and generate electricity. By adjusting to the brightness and temperature of your home, they can even save you money on heating and air conditioning costs.

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

When it comes to mitigating climate change, one set of techniques aims to tackle the problem by making large-scale alterations to our weather. Sometimes called "climate engineering" or "geoengineering," these techniques seek to address rising temperatures by altering the earth's climate system. Geoengineering techniques can be divided into two major classes: those that modify solar radiation and those that remove excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

A Future To Believe In

In Benguela, Angola, the fields surrounding a village called Kanenguerere are strewn with landmines, the legacy of Angola's 27-year civil war which ended nearly two decades ago. In 2017, a unique group called HALO Angola's 100 Women in Demining, supported by Eni, began training and employing local women to remove Angola's landmines. In a country where employment opportunities for women are rare, the project seeks to empower women to take control of their future. Making the land safe has given the children of Kanenguerere the chance that every child deserves to reach their potential and have a future they can believe in.

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story