Are Millennials lazier, more entitled, and more selfish than other generations?

When it comes to their work habits, are Millennials lazier, more entitles, and more selfish than other generations?

There is survey evidence that Millennials score slightly higher on narcissism than other generations. But is that really a generational difference? When you compare generations on anything, and you find a discrepancy, you don't know whether that's because of the birth cohort they're part of, or because of their age and life experience. And there's a psychologist, Jean Twenge, who teases those factors apart. She gets surveys done of every generation - when they were high school seniors and college seniors. So, you can compare what 18 and 21-year-old boomers said against millennials of the same age against Gen Xers of the same age.

And when you do that, you find that every generation is slightly more selfish and entitled when they're younger. Being self-focused is just an attribute of being an 18-year-old or a 21-year-old. And then as you age you tend to gain responsibility and gain concern for others. The greatest spike in generosity seems to exist right around mid-career and midlife and that I think is when you feel like you have more to give, you have less to lose and you also start to worry that if nobody helps that next generation coming into the workforce we are all going to be screwed. So I think there is hope for every young generation.

The Business and Market Fair that recently took place in Sanzule, Ghana featured local crops, livestock and manufactured goods, thanks in part to the Livelihood Restoration Plan (LRP), one of Eni's initiatives to diversify the local economy. The LRP program provided training and support to start new businesses to approximately 1,400 people from 205 households, invigorating entrepreneurship in the community.

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

Are we seeing the creation of a parallel universe for US and Chinese tech industries?

I think the answer is yes. In the past, US has dominated the world in technologies from P.C. operating systems, semiconductors, to servers, and even Internet. But ever since the rise of mobile technologies, China has really leveraged the large market with a huge amount of data and now is beginning to innovate and build great mobile apps on which there's a large amount of data being collected.

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It's been two months since President Trump abruptly ordered the withdrawal of US troops from northern Syria, paving the way for a bloody Turkish offensive in that region. (See our earlier coverage here.) What's happened since? A guide for the puzzled:

No "end date" for US troops in Syria – US Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said this week that the United States has completed its military pullback in northeastern Syria. Back in October, President Trump pledged to withdraw the roughly 1,000 American troops deployed there. Since then, some American troops have left Syria altogether, while others were redeployed to defend nearby oil fields from ISIS, as well as from Syrian government troops and Russia. Now, there are roughly 600 American troops dispersed around Syria, and the remainder have been deployed in Iraq to stave off a potential ISIS resurgence. It's not clear if any troops have returned to the US. When asked about the chaotic comings and goings of US troops in Syria in recent months, the commander of US Central Command said frankly: there's no "end date" for American troops stationed there.

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Turkey's government has captured many thousands of ISIS fighters as a result of its operations in northern Syria. Many of these prisoners have already been deported to some of the more than 100 countries they come from, and Ankara says it intends to send more. There are also more than 10,000 women and children – family members of ISIS fighters – still living in camps inside Syria.

These facts create a dilemma for the governments of countries where the ISIS detainees are still citizens: Should these terrorist fighters and their families be allowed to return, in many cases to face trial back home? Or should countries refuse to allow them back?

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