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Does President Trump's racist tweet unite or divide Democrats?

Does President Trump's racist tweet do more to unite or divide Dmocrats?

I think it does more to unite them. Democrats were fighting amongst themselves before these series of tweets and now Trump has reminded them of what they're fighting against.

Will Joe Biden's healthcare plan appeal to voters?

It won't appeal to hardcore progressives, who want Medicare for all,but it will probably appeal more broadly. It keeps the popular parts of Obamacare while offering a public option. So, yeah I think it has some appeal.

Is there a new debt-limit crisis brewing?

There could be. The debt-limit probably needs to be raised before the middle of September which means before Congress leaves Washington for the August recess So they've got to get it done soon. I think they probably will.

Finally for The Rant.

Today's rant, unsurprisingly, is on Trump and racism and the fact that some people won't call it racist if you tweet that duly elected members of Congress, who are U.S. citizens, should go home, back to the countries they came from - that's racist. So let's call it racist.

Pop quiz: what percentage of plastic currently gets recycled worldwide? Watch this video in Eni's Energy Shot series to find out and learn what needs to be done to prevent plastic from ending up in our oceans. Plastic is a precious resource that should be valued, not wasted.

It's not like things are going well in Mexico.

COVID has killed more people there than in any country except the United States and Brazil. Just 2 percent of Mexicans have gotten a first vaccine jab, compared with nearly 24 in the US. The Biden administration made clear this week that it won't send vaccines to its southern neighbor until many more Americans have been vaccinated. Mexico's government has cut deals for doses from China, Russia, and India.

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A body blow for Pakistan's Prime Minister: Imran Khan suffered an embarrassing defeat this week when members of the National Assembly, the country's lower house, voted to give the opposition bloc a majority in the Senate. (In Pakistan, lower house legislators and provincial assemblies elect senators in a secret ballot.) The big drama of it all is that Khan's own Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) party holds a lower house majority, which means that lawmakers supposedly loyal to his party voted in secret for opposition candidates. Khan's allies claim that PTI members were bribed to support the opposition, and the prime minister says he will ask for a lower house vote of confidence in his leadership. That vote will not be secret, but even if he survives, the political damage is done. Without a Senate majority, he has no chance of passing key reform plans, including constitutional amendments meant to centralize financial and administrative control in the federal government. Khan has, however, refused to resign.

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38: At least 38 people were killed in Myanmar Wednesday, the bloodiest day since the military staged a coup there last month. Witnesses described scenes like "a war zone" when armed forces opened fire on peaceful protesters in cities across the Southeast Asian country.

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Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford University's Cyber Policy Center and former European Parliamentarian, discusses recent developments on big tech, privacy protection and emerging trends in cyberspace.

What immediate impact has the SolarWinds hack had on private companies?

Now, I hope it's meant a shock into action. The SolarWinds hack should be a wake-up call to all companies selling software, because any kind of negligence to ensure the highest security standards will come back as a boomerang to individual companies, but also to the tech sector collectively. Digitalization has come to mean privatization, and connectivity means vulnerability. Add these up and you can see the trust has to be earned every day.

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The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

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