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A missile is launched from a warship during the US-led coalition operation against military targets in Yemen on Jan. 12, 2024.

US Central Command via X/Handout via REUTERS

US and UK hit Houthi targets in Yemen

The US and UK launched strikes against military facilities in Houthi-controlled Yemen on Thursday in response to the rebel group’s attacks on commercial vessels in the Red Sea. The Houthis, who have carried out at least 27 attacks since November, since November, claim to be acting on behalf of Palestinians in response to Israel’s war against Hamas.

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AI explosion, elections, and wars: What to expect in 2024
AI explosion, elections, and wars: What to expect in 2024 | Ian Bremmer | World in :60

AI explosion, elections, and wars: What to expect in 2024

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

What are the global ramifications of Red Sea shipping disruptions?

This is a lot of ships that are carrying a lot of goods that can't go through the Red Sea because the Houthis are hitting them. And so instead they're going around the Cape of Good Hope, which is South Africa. It's a lot longer and it's more expensive. You know, it's not really an impact on the markets in the sense that the goods are still getting through. So it's not like you're not getting your oil, you're not getting your commodities. It is going to hurt the Egyptian economy significantly because they're not getting that transit and the fees. It would benefit South Africa, but their ports are a huge mess. So, I mean, funnily enough, it's probably a benefit for like Namibia and Mozambique and we'll see for how long It lasts.

Was 2023 a good year for Vladimir Putin?

On balance, I would say no. I mean, you know, he had his former chef and his confidant and his paramilitary supporter, you know, Prigozhin with the coup against him and ended up dead. So that's not great. And that was a lot of money that worked for the Kremlin. And also, he's got 11 rounds of sanctions against him and half of his sovereign assets frozen by the Americans, by the Europeans, by the entire developed world. And, of course, he also had a huge hit to his human capital with not only a whole bunch of men getting ground down in the fight, but also a lot of them leaving because they don't want to get caught up. So the last couple of months have been good in the sense that they're not losing territory that they've taken from Ukraine. And so he can spin anything as a win because he's a dictator. But things look horrible for Putin, irrespective of the nature of the fight with Russia-Ukraine.

As 2023 comes to a close, what are the biggest stories to look ahead at in 2024?

Well, I mean, of course, all these elections happening in so many parts of the world. I mean, in India, in the European Union, in the United States, in Russia, of course, which is going to be a real nail biter. Who knows what could happen there. And then you have incredible transition of explosion for artificial intelligence impacting the way all of us live. Massive upside opportunities, massive downside disruptions and governance desperately trying to catch up. Those seem to be some of the biggest things, not to mention the fact that we've got a bunch of big wars going on. And of course, the nature of the Chinese economy, a lot of stuff to focus on.

Ian Explains: How Hezbollah became so powerful in Lebanon
Ian Explains: How Hezbollah became so powerful in Lebanon | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Ian Explains: How Hezbollah became so powerful in Lebanon

Tensions on Israel's northern border with Lebanon are heating up amid daily exchanges of rocket fire between Israeli Defense Forces and Hezbollah fighters. Fears are growing that Israel's war with Hamas in Gaza could spread to a broader regional conflict because Hezbollah is Iran's most powerful proxy force. On Ian Explains, Ian Bremmer unpacks Hezbollah's role within Lebanon, its history of fighting Israel in the south, and how Iran uses the militant group to further its interests in the region.

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Iran thrives on Arab "misery," says expert Karim Sadjadpour
Iran thrives on Arab despair | GZERO World

Iran thrives on Arab "misery," says expert Karim Sadjadpour

Whether it's Hamas in Gaza or Hezbollah in Lebanon or the Houthis in Yemen, how much control does Iran have over its proxy forces? According to Iran expert at the Carnegie Endowment for Peace, Karim Sadjadpour, Iran tends not to micromanage these groups. Iran may not typically give direct, day-to-day instructions but instead defer to these leaders to make their own decisions. However, Sadjadpour adds, on a broader level, Iran wields significant influence as they are often the primary source of funding and military support for these groups.

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What’s Iran’s next move?
What’s Iran’s next move? | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

What’s Iran’s next move?

Remember that famous line from Bill Clinton’s campaign staffer James Carville back in 1992?: “It’s the economy, stupid!” As Israel’s war with Hamas escalates, it brings to mind—in a nasally Louisiana accent—the phrase “It’s Iran, stupid.”

Because, whether it’s the dizzying arsenal of Hezbollah rockets in southern Lebanon pointed at Israel, or the Houthi drones targeting Israel from Yemen, or the Iranian Revolutionary Guard facilities in Eastern Syria-, one thing is clear: all roads lead back to the Ayatollah. And yet, there’s a big difference between skirmishes with proxy forces and an all-out US/Israel war with Iran.

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Caught in the crossfire: Yemen’s forgotten war
| GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Caught in the crossfire: Yemen’s forgotten war

In Yemen, the world’s biggest humanitarian crisis you’ve probably never heard of, 80 percent of people need international aid just to survive. Two-thirds are hungry, and half don’t know where their next meal will come from.

Life is very hard in Yemen, UN Resident Coordinator David Gressly tells Ian Bremmer. Most infrastructure is destroyed, few can access clean water or health care, and many Yemenis are afraid to go outside because of landmines.

Meanwhile, 1.2 million civil servants continue to show up to work, with little or no pay. If they stayed home, the state would cease to exist.

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