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Top Risks 2020

Top Risks 2020

Each January, Eurasia Group, our parent company, publishes its forecast of the top ten global political risk stories of the coming year. You can read the full report here:

The report's authors, Ian Bremmer (our boss) and Cliff Kupchan (fan favorite), raised a lot of eyebrows today by choosing US politics as risk #1 for 2020. We'll detail that choice here, and then touch (very) briefly on the rest of this year's list.

#1 - Rigged!: Who Governs the US? - If the November US presidential vote is close—most of us think it will be—the loser will challenge the legitimacy of the result. And unlike the contested George W. Bush-Al Gore presidential election 20 years ago, this year's loser, regardless of party, is much less likely to simply accept a court-decided outcome as the final word.


Making matters more intense in 2020: The United States is already a deeply polarized nation and, unlike in 2000, the current president believes America's divisions are politically useful.

If Trump wins, Democrats will charge Republicans with "voter suppression" in closely contested states and accuse them of benefitting from foreign interference, particularly from Russia, in the election process. If Trump loses, he'll charge that millions of people voted illegally and that a hopelessly biased media distorted the process.

Whatever the veracity of these charges, millions of Americans on the losing side will decide to believe them—no matter the available evidence. That's why the controversy is as likely to play out in (potentially violent) protests as in the courts.

Then there's the impact, even before votes are counted, on US foreign policy and its implications for other countries. Bremmer and Kupchan argue that President Trump is more likely to "pet the dog" than to "wag the dog," meaning that he's more likely to make bad diplomatic deals that give way too much to Xi Jinping, Vladimir Putin, or Kim Jong-un than to deliberately start a war. (Iran news notwithstanding.)

The bottom line: Inside the distracted and divided military superpower, a president prone to erratic decision-making and an opposition that hates him will face voters ready to render judgment on the political status quo. What could possibly go wrong?

On to the rest of the list…

#2- The Great Decoupling

In 2020, the ongoing decoupling of the US and China will move beyond strategic technologies like semiconductors, cloud computing, and 5G into broader trade and investment. This trend will plague the $5 trillion global tech sector, but also create a deepening economic, and cultural divide that could become permanent, casting a chill over global business.

#3- US/China

As this decoupling occurs, US-China tensions will provoke a more explicit clash over national security, influence, and values. The two sides will continue to use economic tools in this struggle—sanctions, export controls, and boycotts—with shorter fuses and goals that are more explicitly political. Confrontation will grow over Hong Kong, Taiwan, the Uighurs, the South China Sea, and a host of other issues.

#4- MNCs not to the rescue

Far from filling the gaps on critical issues like trade liberalization and climate change created by underperforming national governments, multinational corporations will face new pressures from political officials, both elected and unelected, eager to reassert their authority in 2020.

#5- India gets Modi-fied

Prime Minister Modi's recent actions signal that, to bolster his popularity, he'll move toward religious and economic nationalism and away from the reforms that have lifted the country's economy. State-level opposition to Modi's moves will further polarize the country.

#6- Geopolitical Europe

European officials will chart a more independent course this year—on trade, regulation, and even security. Friction with both the US and China is inevitable.

#7- Politics vs. Economics of Climate Change

As erratic weather takes a heavier human, economic, and political toll around the world, climate change will put governments, investors, and society at large on a collision course with corporate decision-makers, who must choose between carbon reduction commitments and their bottom lines.

#8- Shia Crescendo

The failure of US policy toward Iran, Iraq, and Syria creates serious risks for the Middle East. Though their histories suggest that neither Trump nor Iran's leaders want all-out war, they might well stumble into a costly confrontation. Iraq is now caught between Iran's orbit and state failure. Feckless US policy in Syria isn't helping.

#9- Discontent in Latin America

Following a year of protests and political turnover in multiple Latin American countries, public anger over sluggish growth, corruption, and low-quality public services will keep the risk of political instability high across the region in 2020. Vulnerable middle classes expect more from their governments.

#10- Turkey

President Erdogan's fortunes are in steep decline. Key political allies are becoming rivals, Turkey's economy is in trouble, and outside pressures are growing. When things go badly, Erdogan tends to lash out.

Red Herrings

You don't see populism, Brexit, North Korea, Syria, or Venezuela on this list. That's not because Bremmer and Kupchan expect these stories to disappear, but because they believe that all of them remain long-term issues that are likely to remain (relatively) quiet through 2020.

Khant Thaw Htoo is a young engineer who works in Eni's Sakura Tower office in the heart of Yangon. As an HSE engineer, he monitors the safety and environmental impact of onshore and offshore operations. He also looks out for his parents' well-being, in keeping with Myanmar's traditions.

Learn more about Khant in the final episode of the Faces of Eni series, which focuses on Eni's employees around the world.

On his first day as president, Joe Biden signed a remarkable series of executive orders. Boom! The US rejoins the Paris Climate Accord. Bang! The United States rejoins the World Health Organization. Pow! No more ban on immigration from many Muslim-majority countries. Biden's press secretary reminded reporters later in the day that all these orders merely begin complex processes that take time, but the impact is still dramatic.

If you lead a country allied with the US, or you're simply hoping for some specific commitment or clear and credible statement of purpose from the US government, you might feel a little dizzy today. The sight of an American president (Barack Obama) signing his name, of the next president (Donald Trump) erasing that name from the same legislation/bill, and then the following president (Biden) signing it back into law again will raise deep concerns over the long-term reliability of the world's still-most-powerful nation.

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"There needs to be a dramatic and deep reduction in the amount of debt on the poorest countries. That's clear." As the world's poorest nations struggle to recover from a devastating pandemic, World Bank President David Malpass argues that freeing them of much of their debt will be key. His conversation with Ian Bremmer is part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Listen: Renowned tech journalist Kara Swisher has no qualms about saying that social media companies bear responsibility for the January 6th pro-Trump riots at the Capitol and will likely be complicit in the civil unrest that may continue well into Biden's presidency. It's no surprise, she argues, that the online rage that platforms like Facebook and Twitter intentionally foment translated into real-life violence. But if Silicon Valley's current role in our national discourse is untenable, how can the US government rein it in? That, it turns out, is a bit more complicated. Swisher joins Ian Bremmer on our podcast.

Ian Bremmer discusses the World In (more than) 60 Seconds:

Biden's first scheduled call with a world leader will be with Canada's Justin Trudeau. What's going on with the Keystone Pipeline?

Well, Biden said that that's it. Executive order, one of the first is that he will stop any construction or development of the Keystone Pipeline. This is of course an oil pipeline that would allow further oil sands oil to come to the United States. The infrastructure is significantly overstretched, it's led to backlogs, inefficiency, accidents, all the rest, but it also facilitates more energy development and keeps prices comparatively down if you get it done. So, there are lots of reasons why the energy sector in Canada wants it. Having said all of that, Trudeau, even though he's been a supporter of Keystone XL, let's keep in mind that he did not win support in Alberta, which is where the big energy patch in Canada is located. This is a real problem for the government of Alberta, Canada is a very decentralized federal government, even more so than the United States. The premier of Alberta is immensely unhappy with Biden right now, they've taken a $1.5 billion equity stake in the project. I expect there will actually be litigation against the United States by the government of Alberta. But Trudeau is quite happy with Biden, his relationship was Trump was always walking on eggshells. The USMCA in negotiations ultimately successful but were very challenging for the Canadians, so too with the way Trump engaged in relations on China. All of this, the fact that Trump left the nuclear agreement with Iran, the Paris Climate Accords, WHO, all of that is stuff that Trudeau strongly opposed. He's going to be much more comfortable with this relationship. He's delighted that the first call from Biden is to him. And it certainly creates a level of normalcy in the US-Canada relationship that is very much appreciated by our neighbors to the North.

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The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

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