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High-Tech Acrobatics

High-Tech Acrobatics

High-stakes negotiations between the US and China over technology and trade continue this week, with top Chinese envoy Liu He arriving in Washington. One of the main items on the agenda will be the fate of Chinese tech giant ZTE. Some backstory, for those who haven’t been following every twist and turn:


  • Last month, amid delicate negotiations over the future of US-China trade and industrial policy, officials at the Commerce Department barred US companies from selling parts to ZTE for seven years.
  • The move, a result of the cell phone and networking equipment maker’s failure to abide by a settlement agreement struck after it was found to have violated sanctions against Iran and North Korea, apparently took Trump and other players in the White House by surprise, and left one of China’s biggest tech companies on the brink of collapse.
  • Over the weekend, President Trump reversed course, saying he was working with Beijing to save the company, along with tens of thousands of Chinese jobs. Mr. Liu got on a plane to Washington. Now there’s talk of a deal to lift the ban on ZTE in return for China easing tariffs on US agricultural imports (whether it can be consummated is still an open question).

There’s a lot of noise here: Some Republicans and Democrats have wondered out loud why an America-first President wants to help a Chinese company that US intelligence services consider to be a security threat. Although Trump’s decision removes a major irritant to the US-China relationship at a sensitive time, deeper security concerns about Chinese telecom companies and China’s broader technology rise will persist.

Some other things I took away from the episode:

A chaotic White House was forced to improvise: Usually, executive branch agencies with a stake in a big decisions get to air their views before the president decides on a course of action. Even if President Trump has managed to bend the resulting chaos to his advantage, he may not be so fortunate next time.

China demonstrated that tech is a red line in trade talks: Chinese President Xi Jinping knows that advanced technologies are the key to China’s future. If the US wants to talk about industrial policy, fine, but China can’t be seen to be capitulating the face of US pressure.

This tiff is only one twist in what is going to be a drawn-out negotiation between the US and China.

Empathy and listening are key to establishing harmonious relationships, as demonstrated by Callista Azogu, GM of Human Resources & Organization for Nigerian Agip Oil Company (NAOC), an Eni subsidiary in Abuja. "To build trust is very difficult. To destroy it is very easy," says Callista, whose busy days involve everything from personnel issues to union relationships. She sees great potential for her native Nigeria not only because of the country's natural resources, but because of its vibrant and creative people.

Learn more about Callista in this episode of Faces of Eni.

For the world's wealthiest nations, including the United States, the rollout of COVID-19 vaccine has been rocky, to say the least. And as a result, much of the developing world will have to wait even longer for their turn. Part of the challenge, World Bank President David Malpass says, is that "advanced economies have reserved a lot of the vaccine doses." Malpass sat down with Ian Bremmer recently to talk about what his organization is doing to try to keep millions around the world from slipping deeper into poverty during the pandemic. Their conversation was part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Saturday will mark the beginning of an historic turning point for European politics as 1,001 voting members of Germany's Christian Democratic Union, the party of Chancellor Angela Merkel, hold an online conference to elect a new leader.

Here are the basic facts:

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For the first time in twenty years, extreme poverty around the world is growing. How does the developing world recover from a pandemic that has brought even the richest nations to their knees? David Malpass, the President of the World Bank, is tasked with answering that question. He joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to talk about how his organization is trying to keep the developing world from slipping further into poverty in the wake of a once-in-a-century pandemic.

Joe Biden wants to move into the White House, but the coast isn't clear. He may need some bleach.

Watch more PUPPET REGIME here.

The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

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