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SILICON VALLEY, ETHICS, AND AI — SIGNAL READERS RESPOND​

SILICON VALLEY, ETHICS, AND AI — SIGNAL READERS RESPOND​

A few weeks ago, I wrote about the backlash within Google over its participation in Project Maven, a Pentagon program designed to improve the use of image recognition in drone surveillance footage. I asked readers whether grassroots pressure could act as an effective brake on controversial uses of AI. One well-placed Signal reader in Silicon Valley was skeptical: “Money matters to people,” he replied. Most employees who have invested time and resources in building a career at Google aren’t likely to leave if it starts dabbling in military AI, particularly when military collaboration is only likely ever to be a small part of what Google does. Still, our reader wrote, “We should be careful, nonetheless.”


Google subsequently backed away from the Pentagon project, but a set of new AI principles published by CEO Sundar Pichai in the wake of the controversy made clear that the company would work with governments and the military in other areas that don’t involve weapons or human harm, like cybersecurity. Despite Google’s attempt to draw a clear line on the issue, the boundaries between what constitutes direct harm and mere support for the military’s mission are blurry. Growing US-China competition in AI is also a factor here, according to another reader, who argued that if grassroots movements curtail AI development in the US, “we can rest assured China will extend its lead in this area.” That’s a concern shared by more than a few people in Washington. Google may have backed down in this case, but given these pressures, the debate over tech companies’ involvement in defense and law enforcement is far from over.

Now that Joe Biden is officially US president, leaders from around the world would like a word with him — but where will he make his first international trip?

After a tumultuous four years, many countries are now clamoring for a face-to-face with President Biden. That includes allies who felt abandoned by Trump's "America First" presidency, as well as adversaries with thorny issues on the agenda. We check in on who's pitching him hardest on a near-term state visit.

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Jon Lieber, Managing Director of the United States for the Eurasia Group, shares his insights on what to expect from President Biden's first 100 days:

It's Inauguration Day. And you can see behind me the Capitol Building with some of the security corridor set up that's preventing people like me from getting too close to the building, as Joe Biden gets sworn in as our 46th president. Historic day when you consider that you've got Kamala Harris, the first woman vice president, the first woman of color to be vice president.

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On Wednesday, Joe Biden will become president because eighty-one million Americans, the highest tally in US history, voted to change course after four years of Donald Trump's leadership. Like all presidents, Biden and his vice president, Kamala Harris, take office with grand ambitions and high expectations, but rarely has a new administration taken power amid so much domestic upheaval and global uncertainty. And while Biden has pledged repeatedly to restore American "unity" across party lines — at a time of immense suffering, real achievements will matter a lot more than winged words.

Biden has a lot on his agenda, but within his first 100 days as president there are three key issues that we'll be watching closely for clues to how effectively he's able to advance their plans.

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Kamala Harris was sworn in today as the first woman Vice President of the United States. That means she's only a heartbeat away from occupying the Oval Office — and could well be the Democratic candidate to replace Joe Biden if the 78-year-old president decides to not run for reelection in 2024. Should Harris — or another woman — become US president soon in the future, that'll (finally) put America on par with most of the world's top 20 economies, which have already had a female head of state or government at some point in their democratic history. Here we take a look at which ones those are.

The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

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