Watching/Ignoring

​​​​​​WHAT WE'RE WATCHING

China’s Secret Weapons — US chipmaker Qualcomm abandoned a $44 billion deal to buy Dutch counterpart NXP on Wednesday after a deadline passed with no word from China’s antitrust regulators. Beijing’s approval was the only obstacle holding up the merger. The White House had lobbied hard for this deal, and President Trump spent plenty of political capital bailing out ZTE, a Chinese tech giant pushed to the brink of bankruptcy by US penalties. The saga is another reminder that the US-China trade war isn’t just about tariffs, and that both countries have many weapons at their disposal. The risk of escalation has just gone up.


Zimbabwe’s Election — Since independence in 1980, Zimbabwe has never had an election without Robert Mugabe. That streak will end on Monday. And this will be a vote worth watching. All political parties have been able to hold rallies without police interference, and US an European election observers have been welcomed for the first time in 16 years. In addition, Zimbabwe’s Electoral Commission says its new fingerprint ID system will help prevent the cheating that has marred past elections.

US politics adrift — A vandal attacked Donald Trump’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame with a pickaxe this week, and someone reportedly boarded and set adrift a $40 million 163-foot yacht owned by Trump administration official Betsy DeVos. Some will find these stories funny. Others, like your Friday author, believe there are 100,000 legitimate forms of protest, and vandalism is not one of them. It’s also the last thing the current US political climate needs.

WHAT WE’RE IGNORING

Steve Bannon — First came news the most overrated man in Washington was headed to Europe to launch a pan-European far-right political movement. Because Europeans who win votes with anti-American rhetoric badly need American help. Then came word that Bannon is in regular contact with former UK foreign minister and political bad boy Boris Johnson. Add Nigel Farage, and we’ll have that scene at the end of the film This Is Spinal Tap where the washed-up metal band reunites for a tour of Japan.

Zuckerberg’s Taste in Art — Facebook is having an awful week, but here’s yet another reason why it’s hard to sympathize. The Flemish tourist board accused Facebook this week of censoring a number of posts featuring paintings by Flemish masters—apparently because they included nudity. Let’s be crystal clear: Your Friday author is no fan of all those pudgy little cherubs Rubens has inflicted on us, but Zuckerberg better not be messing with Breughel the Elder.

Putin’s Inflatable Trojan Horse? — A soccer ball Vladimir Putin gave Donald Trump during their Helsinki summit reportedly contains a chip that can transmit information to nearby cell phones. (For the record, this is not satire). We’re ignoring this story because Trump’s well-known aversion to sports that provoke perspiration suggests Russian intelligence is much more likely to learn what 12 year-old Barron Trump wants for dinner than any presidential secrets.

"I knew that history was my life's calling."

On Bank of America's That Made All the Difference podcast, Secretary of the Smithsonian Lonnie Bunch shares his journey and present-day work creating exhibits that inspire visitors to help our country live up to its ideals.

Viktor Orbán, Hungary's far-right populist prime minister, likes to shock people. It's part of his political appeal. Orbán has proudly proclaimed that he is an "illiberal" leader" creating a frenzy in Brussels because Hungary is a member of the European Union.

It's been over a decade since the 58-year old whom some have dubbed "the Trump before Trump" became prime minister. In that time he has, critics say, hollowed out Hungary's governing institutions and eroded the state's democratic characteristics.

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Why do (most) world leaders drink together? It can get them to agree on stuff they wouldn't while sober. Booze "helps people get cooperation off the ground, especially in situations where cooperation is challenging," says University of British Colombia professor Edward Slingerland. Alcohol, he explains, allows you to "see commonalities rather than just pursuing your own interest," which may put teetotaler politicians — like Donald Trump — at a disadvantage. Watch his interview on the next episode of GZERO World. Check local listings to watch on US public television.

In countries with access to COVID vaccines, the main challenge now is to convince those hesitant about the jab to roll up their sleeves, and this has become even more urgent given the spread of the more contagious delta variant. So, where are there more vaccine skeptics, and how do they compare to total COVID deaths per million in each nation? We take a look at a group of large economies where jabs are available, yet (in some cases) not everyone wants one.

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

QR codes are everywhere. Are they also tracking my personal data?

Well, a QR code is like a complex barcode that may be on a printed ad or product package for you to scan and access more information. For example, to look at a menu without health risk or for two-factor verification of a bank payment. And now also as an integral part of covid and vaccine registration. QR codes can lead to tracking metadata or personal data. And when your phone scans and takes you to a website, certainly the tracking starts there. Now, one big trap is that people may not distinguish one kind of use of QR codes from another and that they cannot be aware of the risks of sharing their data.

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Now that the Tokyo Olympics are finally underway, your Signal crew will be bringing you some intriguing, uplifting, and quirky bits of color from a Games like no other…

Today we've got— the best freakout celebrations!

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Tanzania reverses course on COVID: Just four months ago, the Tanzanian government was completely denying the existence of the pandemic. Then-President John Magufuli insisted Tanzania was COVID-free thanks to peoples' prayers, and refused to try to get vaccines. But Magufuli died suddenly in March — perhaps of COVID. His successor, current President Samia Suluhu, has acknowledged the presence of the virus in Tanzania, and although she was initially lukewarm on mask-wearing and vaccines, Suluhu has recently changed her tune, first joining the global COVAX facility and now getting vaccinated herself to kick off the country's inoculation drive. Well done Tanzania, because if there's one thing we've all learned over the past 18 months, it's that nowhere — not even North Korea, whatever Pyongyang says — is safe from the coronavirus.

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16: A new study tracking Earth's "vital signs" has found that 16 out of 31 indicators of planetary health are getting worse due to climate change. Last year's pandemic-induced shutdown did little to reduce global carbon dioxide emissions, stop the oceans from warming, or slow the shrinking of polar ice caps.

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How booze helps get diplomacy done

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