GZERO Media logo

Tense Times for Iran

Tense Times for Iran

Fresh tensions with Israel. Threats to accelerate the pursuit of nuclear weapons. A surprise showing at the G7 last week in France. Iran is in the global limelight again, and the question of whether the 2015 nuclear deal can survive is coming to a head.


Here are three big Iran stories we're following in the coming days:

Iran's nuclear ultimatum put to the test — Ever since the US walked out of the 2015 Iran deal and slapped crippling sanctions on that country, Iran has pressured the Europeans (who are still in the deal) with an ultimatum: unless you provide us with economic help, we'll ditch the deal and pursue nuclear weapons again. This week, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani raised the stakes, warning that Tehran could accelerate its enrichment of uranium to 20 percent fissile purity by Friday unless the Europeans come to the rescue. Twenty percent is a major milestone on the way to reaching weapons-grade enrichment. For perspective, the nuclear deal caps enrichment at just 3.67 percent.

Rising regional tensions — For months, Iran has been at the center of a string of regional flare ups. In response to US sanctions, Iran has allegedly attacked international oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz, a major oil chokepoint, and has engaged in maritime brinkmanship with the US on the high seas. Elsewhere in the region, Iran has allegedly tried to launch "killer drones" at Israeli targets, while tensions have also soared between Israel and the Iran-backed Lebanese proxy Hezbollah. While Iran does not want a full-blown war with Israel, a tactical miscalculation – or moves by overzealous proxies – could lead to a major escalation of hostilities.

Can the French save the day? — Against this tumultuous backdrop France's President Emmanuel Macron has been trying to salvage the Iranian nuclear deal in order to defuse these tensions. Macron on Tuesday offered the Iranians a $15 billion credit line, a move meant to compensate Tehran's loss of crude oil revenues. Taken together with Macron's G7 diplomacy, the French are trying to send a clear message to Tehran: we are committed to the nuclear deal if you are. But the diplomatic overtures already appear to be falling flat, as Iranian President Rouhani backtracks on a mooted meeting with Trump. And on the financial front, unless the US supports Macron's overture, European banks are unlikely to risk running afoul of US sanctions by issuing fresh credit to Tehran.

Khant Thaw Htoo is a young engineer who works in Eni's Sakura Tower office in the heart of Yangon. As an HSE engineer, he monitors the safety and environmental impact of onshore and offshore operations. He also looks out for his parents' well-being, in keeping with Myanmar's traditions.

Learn more about Khant in the final episode of the Faces of Eni series, which focuses on Eni's employees around the world.

Over the weekend, some 40,000 Russians braved subzero temperatures to turn out in the streets in support of imprisoned Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny. More than 3,000 protesters were arrested, and Navalny called on his followers to prepare for more action in the coming weeks.

But just who is Alexei Navalny, and how significant is the threat that he may pose to Vladimir Putin's stranglehold on power in Russia?

More Show less

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take (part 1):

Ian Bremmer here, happy Monday. And have your Quick Take to start off the week.

Maybe start off with Biden because now President Biden has had a week, almost a week, right? How was it? How's he doing? Well, for the first week, I would say pretty good. Not exceptional, but not bad, not bad. Normal. I know everyone's excited that there's normalcy. We will not be excited there's normalcy when crises start hitting and when life gets harder and we are still in the middle of a horrible pandemic and he has to respond to it. But for the first week, it was okay.

More Show less

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Russian opposition leader Navalny in jail. Hundreds of thousands demonstrating across the country in Russia over well over 100 cities, well over 3000 arrested. And Putin responding by saying that this video that was put out that showed what Navalny said was Putin's palace that costs well over a billion dollars to create and Putin, I got to say, usually he doesn't respond to this stuff very quickly. Looked a little defensive, said didn't really watch it, saw some of it, but it definitely wasn't owned by him or owned by his relatives.

More Show less

Even as vaccines roll out around the world, COVID-19 is continuing to spread like wildfire in many places, dashing hopes of a return to normal life any time soon. Some countries, like Israel and the UK for instance, have been praised for their inoculation drives, while still recording a high number of new cases. It's clear that while inoculations are cause for hope, the pace of rollouts cannot keep up with the fast-moving virus. Here's a look at the countries that have vaccinated the largest percentages of their populations so far – and a snapshot of their daily COVID caseloads (7-day rolling average) in recent weeks.

The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

GZEROMEDIA

Subscribe to GZERO Media's Newsletter: Signal