Will Saudi Aramco’s IPO succeed?

What does it mean when Iran says it will begin injecting gas into centrifuges?

It means that they're taking one further step, the most significant so far, to break their own commitment to the Iranian nuclear deal. Keep in mind, the Americans pulled out well over a year ago. And with new sanctions, the Iranian economy is contracted this year by almost 10 percent. So, they're pretty angry about it, and they're lashing out. That's where we are.


Will Saudi Aramco's IPO succeed?

It probably will, because they're actually taking their target price from two trillion, which the markets never believed. That's the high end of the Goldman Sachs estimate. Other banks said: "No way. Closer to 1.2 (trillion), 1.4 (trillion), 1.5 (trillion)." They're showing flexibility and they're going to give benefits to the Saudis that buy shares if they hold them for six months, some 10 percent bonus, something like that. On balance, you think it will succeed, but whether that means that Saudi Arabia will actually start diversifying their economy away from energy, that is a much higher bar.

What happens to the Paris climate accord now that the U.S. has formally withdrawn?

Nothing. Everyone else is still with it. In fact, additional countries have joined since the Americans said they'd pull out. Let's keep in mind that even though they're formally saying they're withdrawing, they aren't withdrawn until the day after Election Day in a year's time. Which means if Trump loses, when the next president comes in, almost certainly will re-sign the Americans into the Paris climate accord. If he wins again, the Americans are out. But hundreds of mayors, 25 governors at this point, and also CEOs in the United States say they're still committed. So, on balance, it is less of a fall apart than you would have otherwise expected.

Earlier this year, two powerful cyclones struck the northern coast of Mozambique and were followed by months of torrential rain. Mozambique faced an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. "The coast road from Pemba airport to the city center and its harbor was totally destroyed," said Franco Picciani, operations manager at Eni Rovuma Basin. The damage brought the city's economy to a standstill.

Eni answered the call, providing its equipment and expertise. "We rebuilt the coast road in less than two months," Picciani said. "We work in the area. We have a logistics base here. It's home to us. When the area needed help, we didn't stop to think about it for a minute. It goes without saying that we should look after the community we work in."

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

Latin America's longest-serving head of state is now out. Bolivia's fiery leftwing President Evo Morales resigned on Sunday, after weeks of increasingly violent protests over his apparent bid to rig last month's presidential elections.

Although he agreed under international pressure to hold a fresh ballot, he and his vice president were ousted by the military after a number of local police units sided with demonstrators.

His supporters say this is an illegal coup that undermines democracy. His opponents say Morales' attempt to rig the election was the real assault on democracy and that the army has merely stepped in to restore order so that elections can be held.

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The system of passports as we know it today dates from roughly a hundred years ago, when leading world powers were trying to figure out a way to regulate international travel in the messy aftermath of World War One. Ever since, these documents have been seen both as boarding passes to freedom and as levers for government control. But which of the world's passports open up the widest vistas of international travel? The Henley Passport Index has an answer. For 199 passports, it tallies up the number of countries that are accessible without obtaining a prior visa. Here's a heat map of which countries' passports are the most powerful right now.

What should we expect now that impeachment hearings go public?

Well, it's a huge week for Democrats, starting Wednesday. They'll take testimony from State Department officials saying that they believe there was a quid pro quo between Trump and Ukraine aid in return for an investigation of Joe Biden. They need to both shape public opinion and try to crack the GOP wall of support for Trump.

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Spain's far right surge — The far right Vox party made the biggest gains in Spain's general election Sunday, more than doubling their seat count to 52 (out of 350), to become the third largest party in parliament. For decades, the stigma of Francisco Franco's dictatorship (1939-1975) seemed to insulate Spain from the far-right populism that's swept Europe in recent years. But now Vox's ultra-nationalists will find it easier to shift the national dialogue on key issues like immigration and quashing the Catalan independence movement. The current Socialist prime minister Pedro Sanchez had hoped that the election – the country's fourth in as many years – would break a political deadlock and strengthen his hand to form a new government. Though Sanchez's Socialists came out on top, they fell short of an absolute majority, losing three parliamentary seats since the last election in April.

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